Cleveland Tests New High Pressure Pumps

Cleveland Tests New High Pressure Pumps

CLEVELAND, O., HIGH PRESSURE TEST MADE OCTOBER 9, 1913. NOTE THE POWERFUL STREAMS.CLEVELAND, O., HIGH PRESSURE TEST. DISCHARGE FROM 5 1/2-INCH OPENING.

The principal observance of Fire Prevention Day at Cleveland, O., Oct. 9, was the final test of the new high pressure pumping station which was accepted by the city the following day. Thousands of people including Mayor Baker and other city officials watched the tests by members of the fire department under the direction of Chief Wallace. The tests took place at the pumping station on Lakeside Ave. Thirteen streams were thrown in one test. All the tests were successful. The pressure on the pumps was 280 pounds. During the test the pumping station water curtain was turned on. This is a sheet of water from the eaves and entirely surrounding the walls of the building. It is designed to protect the pumping station in case of threatening fire in the neighborhood. A second test was held at the foot of St. Clair Ave. A stream from a five-and-one-half-inch hydrant carried across the Cuyahoga river and several hundred feet beyond the west side of the river. It costs about $1 a minute to operate the new station and the 13 test streams passed 10,760 gallons of water every minute. The force of the streams, according to fire department officials, was enough to capsize an ordinary lake passenger vessel and even to wash away a giant office building in a short time; the force was so great that the 13 streams carried nearly three blocks. One stream turned straight up carried to a height of 180 feet.

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