Cohoes, N. Y., Annual Fire Report

Cohoes, N. Y., Annual Fire Report

In his annual report for the year ending November 18, 1913, Chief T. C. Collin, of the Cohoes, N. Y., fire department, states that there were 104 alarms, of which 54 were bell, 43 telephone and seven still alarms. The total loss was $50,522.16, the amount of insurance at risk was $1,913,995, and insurance loss $47,937.16. Nearly one-half of the loss was occasioned by one of the worst fires in the history of the city on March 9, when two citizens lost their lives. The department was in service 00 hours and 45 minutes during the year; 24,800 feet of hose. 707 feet of ladders and 1,081 gallons of chemical water were used. Of the 104 fires, 40 were extinguished with chemicals and 32 by hydrant or engine streams. Only two fires extended to adjoining buildings, and 69 were confined to the floor on which they originated. During the week of May 2 members of the department made an inspection of buildings. Upwards of 2,900 places were inspected, more than 600 notices served and many hundreds of loads of dirt and rubbish were carted away. The appreciable reduction in the number of fires during the past six months is doubtless due. in a great measure, to this “clean up” campaign. All hotels, school houses and manufacturing plants in the city were inspected by the chief engineer during the year and, in numerous instances, improvements were ordered. On six large buildings substantial iron fire escapes have been erected and fire extinguishing appliances have been installed in a number of others. Fire drills have been instituted in all schools where they were not previously practised and are now regularly conducted in a highly satisfactory manner. Chief Collin’s principal recommendations are motor tractors for two engines and one ladder truck, a motor car for the chief, _____renter restriction on the storage and sale of combustible and inflammable materials and a new building law.

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