COLLAPSE OF A 40,000-GALLON TANK.

COLLAPSE OF A 40,000-GALLON TANK.

At Toronto, Ont., on November 22 the big 40,000-gal. water tank erected for George Hees Sons & Co. on their premises in Davenport road collapsed, throwing a deluge of water onto all the houses within 200 yards, and destroying stock to the value of nearly $25,000. The tank was a new one, erected for the Hees firm, in connection with an extensive system of sprinklers for the protection of the property against fire. It was one of the largest in the city, and was set up in an angle formed by two wings of the building, on a tower over 115 ft. high. The tank itself was over 30 ft. above the roof of the factory, and was made of long 20-ft. planks, each some 14 ins. wide and 3 ins. thick. It was built to hold some 40.000 gals. Fortunately at the time of the collapse only some 15,000 gals, had been pumped into it, or the damage would have been much more serious. As it was, the 15-ft. mark had been reached, and the main was pouring the water in so fast that it was expected the tank would have been filled by night. When the crash came, the tower buckled, as if the steel were so much tin. falling over against the wall of the factory. The heavy metal crashed through the brick walls, making a big hole over 25 ft. in diameter. Bricks, mortar and debris of all kinds were thrown over the floors of the factory, utterly ruining the stock. In its fall the tower tore away the sprinklers at the windows, and they added to the mix-up by pouring water freely over everything. The cause of the collapse has not been arrived at. The tower was a wellbuilt huge affair, standing on good concrete foundations. Some of the metal ladder used to ascend the tank is resting in a yard nearly 100 ft. from where the tower stood, while the heavy oak of the tank is splintered into matchwood. It will be almost a total loss. As the tank had not been completed and handed over to the Hees firm, its builders will be responsible for the damage to it and the tower. Who will be responsible for the outside damage is the question. A fire engine had to be requisitioned to pump the cellars and ground floors dry.

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