Colorado Springs Water Report

Colorado Springs Water Report

Interesting figures are contained in the annual report of Superintendent B. B. McReynolds, of the Colorado Springs, Col., water department, for 1912. The report shows receipts from consumers during the year amounting to $154,439.15, and other receipts of $35,006.53, a total of $189,445.68. Against this are expenditures of $38,786.59 for maintenance, $64,320 for interest on bonds, $66,219.44 for payment of bonds, and $22,914.52 for construction, a total of $192,240.55. The net cost of the water works to date is given as $3,179,024.42, and the present bonded debt, $1,572,000, with 4 per cent, the average rate of interest. The statistics regarding consumption show that the estimated population supplied is 32.009; the total consumption for the year was 2.349,293,000 gallons, of which 15 per cent, was metered. The average daily consumption was 6,436,400 and the average daily to each consumer 195 gallons. The cost of supplying water per million gallons, figured on total maintenance, is $16.50, and on total maintenance and interest on bonds, $43.90. One hundred forty-two and four-fifths miles of water pipe is now in use, 5,291 feet was extended during the year and 2,170 feet discontinued. The leaks averaged in number .75 per mile, or only one every 1 ⅛ miles. The storage at the end of the year amounted to 1,165.000.000 in the mountain reservoirs and 230,000,000 in Pike View and Prospect lake, a total of 1,695,000,000. The new precipitation at Lake Moraine for the year was 152.75 inches; rain, 19312 inches.

Colorado Springs Water Report.

0

Colorado Springs Water Report.

The report of Water Superintendent B. B. MeReynolds, of Colorado Springs, Col., shows the most successful year in the history of the water department of that city. The total cash receipts were $147,236,63, a gain of some $4,000 over 1908. The net cash earnings for the system for the year were $37,251.35. Comparison with neighboring cities shows that these earnings are obtained despite a much smaller rate than prevails elsewhere in Colorado. Taking a six-room dwelling as a basis of comparison, Colorado Springs enjoys an annual water rate of $15, against $20.30 for Denver and $30 for Pueblo.

For needed improvements $25,000 worth of bonds were issued. There are $10,911.15 of this hond issue on hand at the present time. Series Nos. 23 and 24 of outstanding water bonds amounting to $60,000 were called in and paid; lluse were 4J4 per cent, bonds and were all that were drawing this rate. The others draw 4 per cent. During the year Colorado Springs used 2,416,912.000 gallons of water. The total flow through the Hydro-Electric Company pipe lines was 2,223,580,700 gallons. Water furnished free to parks, churches and other public institutions amounted to 75,400,000 gallons, worth $4,524. The amount used in street sprinkling was 46,540,000 gallons. On lawns and gardens, 640,760,000 gallons of water were used in the last year. Horse drinking fountains required 26,000.000 gallons, while 5,250,000 gallons were used in drinking fountains. The lire department used 4,096,000 gallons ot water. I lie total quantity of water furnished free was 860.734,750 gallons. The water in storage in mountain reservoirs for domestic use January I, 1910, was 1.753,000.000 gallons. The total storage for all purposes in all reservoirs was 2.141.000,000 gallons.