COMPLETE MOTORIZATION GOING ON.

COMPLETE MOTORIZATION GOING ON.

It is a notable recognition of the value of an entirely motorized fire department that despite the general movement in the direction of economy due to the war the complete motorization of departments has not ceased. It is a recognition that non-motorization is not economy. In this connection the reports that the Board of Public Works of Anderson, Ind., has recommended that the fire department be completely motorized is of interest not alone because of the action itself but of the argument of Councilman Everett Reeves in support of the recommendation. He did not confine himself to generalities, but backed up his assertion of the economy as well as the increased efficiency of motor apparatus by facts and figures, arrayed in convincing form. One argument he presented was that Anderson has an area of six square miles, that one horse-drawn piece of apparatus can efficiently cover one square mile and one motor-driven piece of apparatus two square miles; that, with horse-drawn apparatus, the city lacks two square miles of covering its territory, while with motor apparatus it can cover two square miles more than the city now occupies. He pointed out that whereas the total cost of horse-drawn equipment in twenty years would be over $118,000, the total cost of motor equipment for the same period would be less than $40,000. He itemized costs of upkeep, of new horses, etc., and the results of his figures strongly favored the motor-driven equipment. That complete motorization is going on now is particularly gratifying because it is in just such times as these, with extra fire menaces due to war conditions, that the superior efficiency of motor equipment is needed metre than ever. For this reason the complete motorization of departments should receive a substantial impetus at this time and such instances as that at Anderson is an excellent example to other cities. Another such example is at Memphis, Tenn., where Commissioner G. W. Blackwell aims to have an all-motor department, an improvement which had been advocated by the late Chief John E. McFadden. It is so important that the work of motorizing departments should not be interrupted, especially at this time, that it cannot be too strongly impressed upon municipal officials, interested in municipal economy, that motor apparatus stands for economy as well as efficiency.

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