CONTROLLING THE HAZARDS IN TRANSPORTATION OF FLAMMABLES

CONTROLLING THE HAZARDS IN TRANSPORTATION OF FLAMMABLES

Final Installment of the Sympos’um Which Has Been Appearing Since the September Issue

Lester Barker

Fire Marshal Eugene, Ore.

We have no control over trucks hauling flammable liquids if trucks bear license of approval of the Interstate Commerce Commission. Explosives are covered by the National Board of Fire Underwriters “Suggested Fire Prevention Ordinance,” 1947 edition.

At the present time we have not designated specified routes for trucks hauling flammable liquids or materials.

We have not had any accidents involving tank trucks.

I believe the National Fire Protection Association’s Regulatory Standards for tank vehicles for flammable liquids should be adopted on a state level.

Bernard J. Padgett

Chief, Fire Department Alexandria, Va.

We have a code covering the movement of trucks carrying flammable liquids, explosives, etc., but cannot enforce it if we don’t know when they are passing through.

I believe Federal regulation of these trucks is the answer to the problem.

Donald S. Charles

Chief, Fire Department Charlotte, N. C.

The transportation of flammable liquids, explosives and other hazardous materials is restricted to designated truck routes. Local retail deliveries of gasoline are covered by ordinances regulating tank truck capacity and operational procedures.

We have not had any fires resulting from accidents involving tank trucks.

When possible, all vehicles transporting flammable liquids, explosives, or other hazardous materials in interstate operations should by-pass all thickly populated areas.

Old ordinances covering local operations should be revised to include hazards brought about by present day activities and a closer liaison with representatives of the industry should be established to develop and maintain a strong program of education for personnel, inspection of equipment and enforcement of all regulations.

C. C. Styron

Chief, Fire Department Atlanta, Ga.

All trucks used for the transportation of flammable liquids in bulk quantity exceeding 100 gallons must be inspected by the Chief of the Bureau of Fire Prevention and, unless certified by him as to their compliance with the ordinance, they may not be operated on the streets of Atlanta. This does not apply to trucks bearing the license of approval of the Interstate Commerce Commission or the State Highway Department or to trucks transporting flammable liquids in drums, cans, and other containers of less than 60 gallons individual capacity.

No truck transporting flammable liquids in bulk may be left unattended on any street, highway, avenue or alley, provided that this will not prevent a driver from the necessary absence from the truck in connection with the delivery of his load, except during actual discharge of the liquid when responsible person must be present at the vehicle.

No truck transporting flammable liquids in bulk may be driven inside the fire limits except when making delivery to points within such area. Trucks containing flammable liquids may be parked in open parking lots or on private property, but not closer than 75 feet, except while making delivery, to any place of public assembly or other building in which people sleep. They may not be parked or garaged in buildings other than those specifically approved for such storage by the Chief of the Bureau of Fire Prevention.

No person may transport or carry any explosive in or upon any public conveyance which is carrying passengers for hire.

Every vehicle, while carrying explosives, must have painted on its front, sides and back, in easily legible letters at least four inches high, in contrasting colors, the word “Explosives,” or in lieu thereof must display, in such manner that it will be visible from all directions, a red flag with the word “DANGER’ printed, stamped or sewn thereon in white letters. Such flag must be at least twenty-four inches square and the letters thereon must be at least six inches high.

No person in charge of a vehicle containing such explosive may smoke in or upon such vehicle, drive the vehicle while intoxicated, drive the vehicle or conduct himself in a careless or reckless manner, load or unload such vehicle in careless manner or while smoking or intoxicated.

No person may place or carry in the bed or body, or cause to be placed or carried in the bed or body, of any vehicle containing such explosives, any metal tool or other piece of metal, or any matches.

It is prohibited for any reason to place or carry or cause to be placed or carried, in any vehicle containing explosives, any exploders, detonators, blasting caps or other similar explosive material.

The permit for transporting explosives designates the time when and whereon the same may be transported.

We haven’t had any accidents involving tank trucks.

I believe the travel speed of these trucks should be restricted and the deliveries limited to reasonable hours when traffic is lightest.

Charles E. Lane

Chief, Fire Department

Great Falls, Mont.

We have no control of tank trucks as yet. We are working with the traffic commission to establish a truck route around the city. We have adopted the suggested fire prevention code of the National Board of Fire Underwriters which gives us some jurisdiction over the trucks delivering gasoline to filling stations.

We have had no accidents with tank trucks so far.

I think that some route should be specified for the operation of this kind of hauling. It should be presented to the haulers with the request for their cooperation.

Abel S. Eldridge

Chief, Fire Department Newport, R. I.

The fire department specifies the streets trucks carrying flammable liquids, explosives and other hazardous materials should travel, and also the time of their movement.

We have not had any fires or catastrophies resulting from accidents involving these trucks.

During World Wars I and II, much explosive material was trucked in and out of Newport without a fire or explosion of any kind. This was due entirely, in my opinion, to the safety precautions taken by the Navy and the fire department.

(Continued on page 72)

The driver of a truck was killed when the truck and a gasoline tanker came together on a highway near Tracy, Calif., on October 17, 1953.

Transportation of Flammables

(Continued from page 43)

Walter J. Flores Chief, Fire Department Allentown, Pa.

The only answer to the problem of the movement of trucks carrying explosives and flammable liquids is the bypassing or skirting of city limits.

We have not had any fires or catastrophies involving these trucks.

William Ruehle Chief, Fire Department St. Cloud, Minn.

We do not have control over the movement of trucks carrying flammable materials or explosives through the streets of this city.

We have not had any accidents involving such trucks.

The ultimate answer, in my opinion, is control by ordinance or legislation.

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