Controversy Between City and State on Chauffeur Licenses

Controversy Between City and State on Chauffeur Licenses

There is a clash between the city of Atlanta and the State of Georgia regarding the licensing of motor fire apparatus. The chauffeur for Chief W. B. Cody was arrested on accusation made by the secretary of state that his car bore no license tag and that he holds no chauffeur’s license. City Attorney James L. Mayson asked for a verdict of not guilty on the ground that a municipality cannot be taxed except by a special act of the legislature. Solicitor Lowry Arnold, who argued the point for the State, contended that the State license was not a tax, but a fee and a means of identification for automobiles and that on this ground the city fire apparatus should be subject to the law the same as an individual car. Assistant Solicitor Hill argued that although in case of an accident a person could not sue the city, still he would have a legal right to sue the chauffeur, and for that reason, if for no other, a license tag should be compulsory for means of identification. Judge Calhoun’s decision is awaited with great interest because it will have such a far-reaching effect.

George Washington Woodward, the oldest exempt fireman in Newark. N. J., died on his 88th birthday, November 6. He was one of the volunteer department who dragged a small wooden fire truck about 50 years ago.

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