COPPER IN THE WATER SUPPLY.

COPPER IN THE WATER SUPPLY.

Says the Boston Advertiser: It may seem strange if Professor Moore, who has already won a national fame as the discoverer of his famous solution, should be the first man to discard it; but it is possible that this may come to pass. He is now studying the effects of sheet copper, introduced in reservoirs, to take the place of the copper, solution. He has been struck by the fact that, in the Far East, the natives (who seem less exposed to enteric diseases than the Europeans) use copper vessels for water. They cling to the copper dish as to their family idol. They do not care for chinaware, for waterpots, it is said, and their belief may have more behind it than Europeans appreciate. It may be that the sheet copper does purify drinking water. If so. Professor Moore will have reached by scientific methods, perhaps, the same sanitary precaution that the Asiatic has practiced for countless centuries, simply because his forefathers did. If the copper sheet in the reservoir will do the work, it ought to he preferred to the copper solution. It would probably do its work more slowly, but on the other hand it could not be discovered chemically by any such test as the State chemists have just successfully carried out on the Belchertown samples. From the very beginning of Professor Moore’s public tests, we have believed that it may be found that the algae are killed by some weak electrical force started by the copper solution rather than poisoned by the copper, chemically. If so, the copper sheet would do the work better, because there would be 110 copper in the water drunk from the reservoirs. Professor Moore is so broad a scientist that he would not stick to his first invention if he should get the better results from his newer tests. [It may be noticed that Hahnemann, the founder of the Homoeopathic school of medicine, having seen that workers in the copper mines and coppersmiths were immune from Asiatic cholera, introduced copper into his pharmacoprca as a remedy for that disease. Hence probably the fact of the Orientals, with their copper water vessels being less exposed to enteric diseases than EUROPEANS.-ED F. AND W. E.

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