CORK, IRELAND.

CORK, IRELAND.

The fire brigade of Cork, Ireland, a few years ago, like many others in the British Isles and on this side of the Atlantic, was more or less (rather more) of a burlesque than a corps to be taken seriously. Of late years, however, it has been pulled up to a condition better befitting a city of such importance as that which it is intended to protect. It was recently subjected to severe tests, when it was suddenly called to give exhibitions of its promptitude in getting out and to work without any warning being given beforehand. These consisted of extinguishing a fire near the top of the water chute in the exhibition grounds, extinguishing a fire in an impromptu office, and in one in which was represented to Ire a tar factory. In one of the performances the brigade, under tile direction of Superintendent A. J._ Hutson, had dressed, got out the machine and rescued two men within one minute of receiving the alarm. Chemical engines were used very successfully in extinguishing the office and factory fires. In connection with the display, Superintendent Hutson showed the use of a non-inflammable dress for night wear of an easily obtained material. The fire escape competition (four men and officer) was also interesting. In this event the exercises consisted of run and raise escape; rescuing two persons from an elevation of forty feet from window. The competitors were situated as in the fire station, their tunics, belts, axes and helmets hanging on the rack, and hoots standing under. Time was taken from the signal to start dressing and terminated when .the firemen brought down the second person and touched the ground. Each fireman and officer was completely dressed. Judging from the exhibition, no one in Cork need fear being burned to death, provided always, of course, there is no delay in notifying the brigade of the fire. During the past year the calls are thus catalogued: ‘‘Serious” (meaning every outbreak that was not absolutely trivial) fires, “forty-seven; chimney, lamp and defective hearth fires, 112; ambulance cases, sixty ; water bursts and want of water, twenty-three; sanitary cases (falling in of sewers, roads, arches, etc., fourteen; and false alarms, five. Whether water bursts or want of water predominated is not stated. Fourteen persons were rescued by means of fire escapes, and one of them afterwards died from burns. In all, eight lives were lost by fires, caused chiefly by clothes in contact, lamp accidents and juveniles playing with matches. The usual duties were performed by the men, and drills were well attended. It will be seen that the Cork firemen, like their brethren in tile United States, arc frequently called upon to perform duties that are altogether unconnected with fire protection. Superintendent A. J. Hutson, it may be mentioned, is a pupil of Sir Eyre Massey Shaw, K. C. B., formerly chief officer of the Metropolitan fire brigade of London, and has a distinguished record as the savior of many lives from both fire and water.

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