Cotton Oil Mill Proves an Easy Prey at Hobart

Cotton Oil Mill Proves an Easy Prey at Hobart

A destructive fire recently wiped out a mill containing cotton seed, hull and machinery at Hobart, Okla. The structure was a one-story wooden building, 175 by 75 feet area, located in the eastern part of the city. It had no partition walls or fire prevention appliances. At 11.30 p. m. the building was found to be all afire, with a strong wind fanning the flames. On receiving the telephone alarm the members of the department responded immediately and found the sections known as the hull and seed houses already burned down. The wind was then blowing a gale, as reported by Chief Roy Quick, who, with six firemen, soon had three good hydrant streams at work, having laid 1,400 feet of hose. These streams were connected up to the two four-inch double hydrants, set 400 feet apart. The nozzles were only threequarters inch in diameter and the fourinch street main furnished 52 pounds pressure. The department has no motor apparatus or pumper, but did their best with the one piece of available apparatus. a hose and chemical truck made by the Luverne Automobile Company. The loss, which was complete, totaled $250,000, and it could hardly have been otherwise, in view of the nature of the fire, the character of the contents and difficulty experienced in fighting such a fire with poor equipment. The cause is unknown.

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