Dallas Fire Department Ranks High

Dallas Fire Department Ranks High

“There is perhaps no department of the city to which the township at large points with greater pride than the fire department, directed by H. F. Magee, as chief, with T. A. Myers, J. L. Marder and F. F. Bennett as assistants, ranking in the order named,” says on of the local papers in Dallas, Tex. “The department boasts of 15 captains, 11 engineers and 108 men in rank. The department has the following equipment: One chief’s automobile equipped with Babcock extinguishers, axes, etc.; four motor-driven combination pump and hose wagons, eight horsedrawn fire engines, one aerial hook and ladder truck (horse-drawn), one motor-driven hook and ladder truck, three city service horse-drawn hook and ladder trucks, two motor-driven chemical engines, two horse-drawn chemical engines, four horse-drawn combination hose wagons, six hose reels, four plain hose wagons, five wagons and buggies. During the last year the board has purchased for the fire department one auto truck at a cost of $5,250, one motor-driven combination pump and hose wagon . $8,250 (to be delivered March 13, 1913); 6,000 feet of new 2 1/2inch hose. The new Central fire station building is to cost approximately $20,000; the Young street station, approximately $15,000, and the Forest avenue station approximately $13,000. These figures do not include the cost of the lots on which the buildings are located. In the case of the new Central station the city purchased the site on which was located a two-story building, at $48,000. Chief Magee will recommend to the board the expenditure of several thousands of dollars during the ensuing year in converting four horse-drawn fire engines and the large horsedrawn aerial truck into motor-driven apparatus. He will also recommend the rebuilding of two horse-drawn chemical engines into motor-driven combination chemical engines and hose wagons. He estimates this improvement would increase the efficiency of the department fully 30 per cent, without necessitating increasing the number of men, and a number of horses could be dispensed with as a result. He will also recommend two new fire stations, one to be located in the extreme northeastern portion of the city and the other in the western limits of Oak Cliff. Several additional fire alarm telegraph boxes will be installed during the year, although there are now in service a total of 263, which is more than the combined number of any other two large cities in the State. According to a record compiled by Chief Magee, the first motor-driven combination pump and hose wagon purchased by the city of Dallas answered 500 alarms during the first eight months in service, pumped 100 hours at fires, laid 125,000 feet of hose, and this performance was better than that of eight steam fire engines combined during that period of time. The records also show that the motor-driven combination pumps and wagon have been maintained at a cost of from $16 to $25 per month as against $80 for the horse-drawn fire engine. The new Central fire station is to be a three-story fireproof structure and will be equipped with only motor-driven apparatus. It will provide a comfortable dormitory for the men, as well as a large gymnasium with shower and tub baths. Space in the building will also be assigned to the Gamewell fire alarm system and for a private telephone exchange connecting all of the various fire stations in the city, of which there arc thirteen at present. The private exchange is to be used exclusively by the fire department and will, undoubtedly, greatly increase its efficiency. The Young street station, located 125 feet west of South Ervay street, is a modern two-story building, and will be ready for occupancy by No. 4 engine company about Jan. 15.

CHIEF H. F. MAGEE, DALLAS, TEX.CHIEF MILES HUMPHREYS, PITTSBURGH, PA.CHIEF FRANK G. REYNOLDS, AUGUSTA, GA.

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