Davenport (Ia.) Water-Works.

Davenport (Ia.) Water-Works.

RECENT WATER-WORKS IMPROVEMENTS AT DAVENPORT, IA.

The Davenport Water-works Company are alive to the necessity of keeping pace with the growth and development of the city. The work of improvement just completed is noteworthy in view of its characteristics, being in brief the construction of a coffer dam, and laying an intake pipe to reach the deep water channel of the Mississippi. This pipe, thirty inches in diameter, is an extension from the shore end of the old pipe to the deep water channel, a distance of 700 feet. The scheme in connection with the enlargement of a filter plant now in progress will place the Davenport Water-works Company in the front rank of Mississippi cities, distinguished for making effort in the direction of satisfying the wants of the people demanding good water.

Work on the coffer dam proper was commenced by the contractors October 6, and the placing of the last piece of the intake pipe was finished October 26, completing the work in twenty days.

Total length of coffer dam, out to out, 500 feet.

Total width of coffer dam, out to out, 74 feet.

Total width of each string, 10 feet.

Depth of water, from two to five feet.

The cribs of the breakwater built above the dam were 6x8x12 feet, filled with rock, and sheeted on upper side with plank.

The intake pipe is of cast-iron, thirty inches in diameter, securely jointed with lead, and the total length of old and new intake pipe is now 700 feet.

The possible supply capacity of this new intake pipe, at an ordinary stage of water, is over 20,000,000 gallons per day, or far in excess of the probable demands for the next twenty-five years.

It is very difficult at this time to give a correct figure of the cost of this work, but approximately, including the pipe, gate house connection (which was put in last year at a cost of over $6000), the taking out of dam, etc., it will not be putting it too high to say that this work will cost about $30,000.

In conclusion, it is only just that due credit be given to G. W. Baker, the supervising engineer, also P. T. Walsh, of the firm of Edwards & Walsh, who have had the work in charge.

No posts to display