Death of Chief H. A. Isermann

Death of Chief H. A. Isermann

Chief Henry A. Isermann, of Kenosha, Wis., died at his residence in that city on the morning of April 18, after an illness of several weeks with pneumonia. For more than ten years he had been at the head of the Kenosha fire department and in that time he had carried out progressive ideas and through them had brought the department to such a degree of excellence that it was pointed to as a model. He was born in Kenosha October 12, 1870. He was educated in the old St. George School and in the High School of Kenosha, and he started out in life as a clerk in his father’s store. Later he went to work with the Bain Wagon Company. As a boy he ran to all the fires and just as soon as he was old enough he enlisted in the volunteer fire department. His first active service in the department was with the Bain Hook and Ladder Company, which he joined in 1892. He joined the paid fire department in 1896 and served as a pipeman and a driver. He was named as assistant chief of the department by James S. Barr. When Mr. Barr retired, in 1906, he became chief. He urged the installation of motor equipment. He worked out advanced ideas in housing the men who were under his command. He took an active part in every movement for the advancement of fire prevention and he was regarded as one of the leading aides of the Wisconsin State Fire Marshal in spreading this doctrine. He was a member of the International Association of Fire Engineers and the State Firemen’s Association. Mayor Charles H. Pfennig said: “Chief Isermann was one of my best personal friends, and I have known the great work that he has done for the advancement of the Kenosha fire department. Few men had shown a greater interest in the work of fire fighting and fire prevention. His death is a distinct loss to the city of Kenosha.” Flags hung at half mast on the City Hall and on all public buildings in the city as a tribute to his memory. Chief Isermann is survived by his wife, four daughters and a son and by his mother and seven brothers.

Chief H. A. Isermann.
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