DEATH OF CHIEF MARJENHOFF.

DEATH OF CHIEF MARJENHOFF.

In last week’s impression was briefly chronicled the death from apoplexy of Chief O. G. Marjenhoff, of the Charleston, S. C., fire department, which sad event took place at his home, just after lie had returned from a midnight fire. During the time that he was emraged in the work of extinguishing the fire, the chief felt indisposed, and, after he had got it under control, placed Assistant Chief Behrens in charge and hastened home While changing his clothes he was suddenly seized with violent pain and fell down unconscious. His life chbed rapidlv away, and just as the “four taps” was being sounded—the signal that the fire was out—he passed away before the sound of the bell had ceased. To him it was in every sense a “pass ing bell” that tolled for his entrance into the unseen world. Chief Marjenhoflf, who was sixty-one years of age, left a widow, two sons and two daughters. Mayor Rhett. on hearing of the chief’s death, was deeply shocked and said it was a “great loss.” He added: “I have never known a more efficient, intelligent and capable officer. His workin this city cannot be estimated in dollars and cents, for his experience, courage and endurance were often called into service when not only property, but human lives were at stake—and he has never faltered, no matter how hard or long the task imposed bv the common enemy. I am too much shocked and feel too keenly about it just now to adequately express myself; but I must repeat what I said at first, that his death is a great loss to the community and the State.” A local paper says: “Chief Marjenhoflf was a great deal more in Charleston than the head of her model fire department. He was ever ready to assist in any enterprises that seemed for the advancement of the city’s prosperity.”

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