Death of Frederick A. Smith.

Death of Frederick A. Smith.

THE LATE FRED A. SMITH

On Tuesday, January 30th, Frederick A. Smith died suddenly, supposed from an apoplectic stroke, while enjoying what seemed to be excellent health. He left his home in Brooklyn on the morning of his death, after making arrangements to attend a concert in the evening, and transacted his usual business at the office of the Neptune Meter Company at 90 West Street, New York city. He had luncheon at a nearby restaurant and then visited a barber shop where, while seated in a chair, he became suddenly ill, and the barber had barely reached him in time to prevent his falling to the floor. An ambulance was called and he was taken to the Hudson Street Hospital, but he never regained consciousness and died almost immediately after reaching there. Thus ended tbe career of one of the brightest young men in tbe waterworks business of the country. Fred Smith, as everyone called him. was only thirty-seven years of age. He was educated in the Polytechnic Institute of Brooklyn and soon after leaving there he started out to handle the sales of waterworks appliances of which his father had control. His first appearance was at the Atlanta convention of tbe American Waterworks Association in 1895. Here lie exhibited and demonstrated the working of the French pipe cutting machine, and although only a very young man, his earnestness and perseverance won for him much praise from the members who watched his careful working and description of the machine. For sometime he continued to exploit this tool until the valve inserting machine, another useful appliance, was perfected by Messrs. Sherrerd and French. The sale of it was entrusted to Fred Smith, and it soon became well-known among waterworks men. One day while in Boston giving an exhibition of the valve inserting machine, an arrangement was made wth hint to commence tbe sale of water meters, and from the start he again proved bis ability in this new field. He was New York manager for tbe Hersey Manufacturing Company for several years. Lately he joined the Neptune Meter Company, and as its Eastern manager showed his usual cleverness in dealing with agents and bis skill as a salesman. Thus while approaching the zenith of bis prosperity and enjoying the fruits of his industry he was suddenly taken away, leaving all that was most desired to ensure a long life of happiness. Fred Smith bad a most unassuming manner, a very genial disposition, liberal and good natured, a gentleman always, so that it was not difficult, being so equipped, to make friends at sight. He was probably one of the best known men in the waterworks supply business, as well as one of the best liked. He was among the originators of the Waterworks Manufacturers’ Association, and a past president of that association. He was also treasurer of the National Water Main Cleaning Company. The funeral services which were held at the residence of his father, 120 St. Marks Avenue, Brooklyn, on Thursday, February 1st, were attended by a large number of his friends and associates. Fred Smith was married about twelve years ago to Miss Florence Whitaker of Boston, who, with her husband, has been a regular attendant at the conventions of the American Waterworks Association. She, as well as several relatives, arc left to mourn the loss of a husband and friend. Tbe proprietor of this journal, who is deeply grieved at the sudden cutting off of his most esteemed friend, tenders his most sincere sympathy to the bereaved members of his family.

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