Death of Junius Schenck.

Death of Junius Schenck.

It is with profound sorrow that wc announce the death of Junius Schenck, vice-president of the Eureka Fire Hose Company of this city, in the fifty-fourth year of his age. His death came very suddenly. On Sunday evening he left his home to attend to some business at Syracuse. On Monday, while in the express office in that city, he suddenly fell and died almost instantly. The cause of his death is understood to be valvular heart disease. Mr. Schenck had been identified with the manufacture and sale of fire hose lor more than twenty years, and was one of the best known men in the business. As a salesman he had few superiors, and subsequently as an executive manager lie was eminently successful. In his early days, in the hose business, rubber hose was fast superseding the old leather hose that had been so long in use, and Mr. Schenck was largely instrumental in bringing it to the attention of fire departments. He devised many improvements in the manufacture of rubber hose, and one or two patents upon material improvements were issued to him. One of these was for the application of carbolic acid to rubber hose, producing what has been extensively known in the trade as carbolized rubber hose. At a later date he saw the original experiment made in weaving tubular cotton hose, and from that time became identified with that industry. Cotton or canvas hose had been previously used, being riveted together with copper rivets on the side, but Almet Reed, an inventor of looms, devised machinery for weaving hats without a scam. Mr. Schenck saw this operation and immediately conceived that it would t>e a splendid idea to manufacture hose in this manner. He persuaded Mr. Reed to make experiments in this direction, and the result was the production of a short niece of cotton hose woven in this manner. This was the first seamless hose ever woven, and a piece of it, a few feet long, cost the manufacturers some $20,000. This cost was well warranted, however, for the machinery for manufacturing seamless woven hose was thereby brought into existence. While the invention was that of Mr. Reed, nevertheless Mr. Schenck was entitled to much credit for the persistency with which he encouraged the inventor and ultimately made a success of this material. When this hose was ready for the market, the Eureka Eire Hose Company was organized, with Mr. Reed and Mr. Schenck among its incorporators and executive officers. The fabric immediately took a high position in the fire department, and the Eureka Fire Hose Company became one of the leading producers of fire hose in this country. Mr, Schenck has been general manager of the company since its organization, and had general direction of its affaire. Mr. Reed died a few years ago, and his son, J. Van i). Reed, succeeded to the presidency of the company, Mr. Schenck being made vice-president and general manager.

In his earlier life Mr. Schenck was engaged in trade with China, and spent some years in that country. ‘His health became impaired, however, and he returned home and engaged in business here as above outlined. He was an active, energetic and intelligent business man, genial and pleasant in his manner, a firm and trusty friend to all who enjoyed intimate relations with him. In the prosecution of his business lie had visited every city and village of importance in this country, and was well known to the heads of fire departments and city officials in most of them. He had a keen knowledge of men, and had surrounded himself with representatives of his company that were possessed of keen intelligence and excellent ability in their line of business. Among these were George W. Wales, Charles A. Landy, George A. Wies, Isaac B. Markcy and others. His cousin, W. T. Y. Schenck of San Francisco, represented the company for the Pacific coast.

The death of Mr. Schenck in suh a sudden and unexpected manner is a severe shock to his large circle of friends who entertained for him a degree of admiration and love much stronger than is usually developed in business circles. His loss to them and to the company lie represented is a severe one, and will be sincerely mourned. Mr. Schenck was married, but had no children, his wife surviving him. He was a member of the Holland Society of New York, his ancestors having been natives of Holland, and of the Oxford Club of Brooklyn. The father of Mr. Schenck was the late Dr. J. P.Schenck of Fishkill, N. Y., where the body of the deceased was taken for burial. Funeral services were held at bis late residence, 153 South Oxford street, Brooklyn, N.Y., Thursday evening, at eight o’clock There was a large attendance of friends and relatives, while many who were unable to be p’esent at the services in the evening were callers at the house during the afternoon to express their condolences. The burial took place at Fishkill, and was conducted in private.

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