Death of Timothy Woodruff

Death of Timothy Woodruff

Timothy Woodruff, who up to about three years ago was superintendent of the Bridgeton, N. J. Water Works, which position he held for thirty-five years, died at his home in that city on August 12. He was nearly seventy-five years old. Mr. Woodruff was the best known water works man in the country. He was a member of the American Water Works Association and attended all its conventions at which he was a prominent figure, taking a keen interest in matters affecting water works. He was the first water superintendent of the Bridgeton works, taking the position when the city water was introduced in 1876. At that time he acted as his own engineer, bookkeeper and collector as well as superintendent. Under Superintendent Woodruff’s administration the water system grew and expanded and about three years ago he retired, being the first city official to receive a. pension. The movement for this was spontaneous and the general appreciation of his efficient services throughout so many years was shown when he was told in response to his protests, that he was receiving back pay in reality. Superintendent Woodruff was the son of the late Simon and Ruth Woodruff and was born in Bridgeton where he spent his life with the exception of a few years. He attended Bridgeton schools and then learned the machinists’ trade, commencing at a machine shop in Bridgeton and then at a shop in Philadelphia. He entered the United States navy as an engineer, serving three or four years during the Civil War. One year of this time he spent at the Isthmus of Panama. Latter for several years he was in the machine shops of the Camden and Amboy division of the Pennsylvania railroad, having charge of all the pumping stations along the road. Mr. Woodruff devoted thirty-five years to the work connected with the development of Bridgeton water system. Mr. Woodruff had travelled considerably and last winter while he was in Florida, during an unusually cold spell, he contracted a cold which weakened him. While he was in poor health for some time he was able to be up and about. On August 11 lie was seized w’ith a severe attack of neuralgia and kept to his bed during the day. He was found dead in bed in the morning, and it is believed neuralgia reached his heart. Mr. Woodruff was a member of A. L. Robeson Post, G. A. R.; and of Evening Star League, No. 97, F. and A. M. and Brearley Chapter, R. A. M. He is survived by his wife, one son, Charles C. Woodruff, and three daughters.

Timothy Woodruff.

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