Deaths from Typhoid in Fifty Largest Cities.

Deaths from Typhoid in Fifty Largest Cities.

In the table below is given in order the fifty largest cities in the United States, with the population as reported by the United States Census Bureau for the year 1910. The number of deaths from typhoid reported from each city by its Board of Health is also shown, the deaths per 100,000 and the rank which this rate of mortality designates.

A study of the figures of the years 1909 and 1910, as shown in the table, is thoroughly bewildering In the main the tendency has lieen downward, yet in the interior portion of the country there lias been a uniform increase. St. Louis and Cincinnati offer a striking contradiction of this statement, the change in rank of the former being from 18 to 8 and in the latter from 15 to 1. It is equally noteworthy that the eastern cities, with but rare exceptions, show a decrease in the mortality rate from this disease. Chicago, Cleveland. Pittsburgh, Milwaukee. Minneapolis, Kansas City, Indianapolis. Louisville and St. Paul all show material increase. W hile on the other band. New York, Boston. Newark. Washington and Fall River show proportionate decrease. Exceptions to this latter class are Baltimore, Providence, Rochester and Lowell. Cincinnati lias dropped to the first position in rank through the adoption of filters, while Louisville, using the water from the same stream, has changed from 43d to 58th Of the lake cities, Cleveland stands second only to Chicago, surpassing in position Milwaukee, Detroit, Toledo and Buffalo. -There seems little ground for a contention that the general condition of the water supply can in anywise have a serious bearing upon typhoid conditions The fluctuation in the number of deaths during different years without change in method of water supply and the fact that the greatest number of deaths occur in the fall months when there is no danger of floods or general cleaning agencies polluting the water, all seems to justify this statement. It has been invariably true that for some years there has been a rapid rise in the number of cases reported anil in the consequent deaths at the time of the spring freshets. But during the fall months other agencies both within the city itself and those imported by people returning from various summer outings seem beyond question to he responsible for the disease.

DEATHS IS FROM TYPHOID 1910.

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