DESTRUCTIVE FIRE AT OTTAWA.

DESTRUCTIVE FIRE AT OTTAWA.

On May 10 a conflagration, second only to the great fire of April 26, 1900, swept over forty blocks of the city of Ottawa, Ont., the capital of the Dominion of Canada. About 250 houses were destroyed, and probably 2,000 people are homeless. The financial loss will be fully $500,000. The conflagration devasted the area between the Ottawa and Parry Sound railway tracks on the east, Albert on the north, and the tracks of the Canadian Pacific Prescott line and Third avenue on the west. The loss is about half covered by insurance. While it was generally believed at first that an incendiary had started the fires, doubts have since been thrown upon this theory. It is said that the blaze was seen in the grass before it seized the lumber. There were from 10,000,000 to 15,000,000 feet of lumber burned. The buildings destroyed were dwellinghouses and stores. No lives are known to be lost. While the buildings are pretty well insured, some of the tenants had nothing on their furniture. A good many of these, however, succeeded in saving their effects. Through an accident to the water pipes it was nearly an hour after the fire was discovered before water was thrown upon the flames, and in that time they made great headway. Assistance arrived from Montreal, but it was not required. The militia was called out to aid the civil power in combating the fire. The fire-swept area was that burned by the $16,000,000 fire of April 26, 1900. The houses and other buildings had been rebuilt, and were of stone, brick, or brick-veneered frame.

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