Destructive Fire in Jersey City.

Destructive Fire in Jersey City.

Three alarms brought the greater part of the fire department of Jersey City, under Chief John Conway, to the Lafayette section of the city recently, where fire had been discovered in the boilerroom of the New York Veneer Seating Company’s building. It was a twostory frame structure, 150×100 feet, 20 years old, with frame partition walls and containing a stock of dry varnished veneer seatings, which the flames caught rapidly and created a very warm light. Chief Conway realized that he had a bad blaze to deal with, and at intervals of a few minutes he sent out second and third alarms that brought 6 steamers, 3 ladder trucks, a chemical, hose wagons and full crews of men to the scene. There was a 16-inch main in the street alongside of the building, and a 6-inch main on the other. There were three 4 1/2 and two 2 1/2 inch hydrants on the 16-inch main from which a good pressure was had, but on the 6-inch the pressure never exceeded 48 pounds. Ten engine streams from 1 1/4 to 1 1/2 inch Callahan shut-off nozzles were directed on the flames at one time, but they had only moderate effect. Three thousand feet of cotton, rubber-lined hose were stretched, of which two lengths burst during the fire. The efforts of the firemen were unavailing to save the property, and in one and a half hours it was completely destroyed, as will be seen by the illustration. The lumber piles in the yard, however, were saved. The total loss is estimated at $80,000, of which $10,000 is apportioned to the contents, consisting of veneer seats for chairs and settees.

ALL THAT REMAINS OF THE JERSEY CITY FACTORY.

DESTRUCTIVE FIRE IN JERSEY CITY

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DESTRUCTIVE FIRE IN JERSEY CITY

By the irony of fate, a fire, the cause of which is not known, started in the works of the Philip Carey Fireproofing company, Jersey City, N. J. As the building was of frame, 200 feet long, and fifty wide, and was filled with inflammable stuff, and was blazing fiercely when the first engine arrived, a general alarm was turned in. The fire would have been confined to that building but for the fact that, when the roof fell in, the firemen were driven back. Before they could resume work, the fire had spread to the cooperage shops of the Jarvis Tobacco Inspection company—another frame building TOO feet long and forty feet wide. This was soon ablaze and was destroyed, with 200 hogsheads of Kentucky tobacco. When the roof of this building fell in. Captain Newby, of engine No. 6, Captain Costigan. of engine No. 5, and several firemen were prostrated by the fumes of the burning tobacco, and were carried by their comrades to Provost street, where they speedily revived, with the exception of Captain Now by. who was unconscious for half an hour. The loss will probably be about $100,000.