DETROIT FIRE NOTES.

DETROIT FIRE NOTES.

[Special correspondence of FIRE AND WATER.]

DETROIT, MICH., May 18, 1897.

The five day bill is now a law, the governor having signed it last week; now comes the most important part of all—viz. what action the commission will take with regard to it.— Engine company No. 4 will soon move to the quarters— Twentieth and Fort streets, which they will occupy while their present house is being razed, and a new one built in its place; the new house will be similar in appearance to that of engine company No. 22.—Lamed street will soon be paved, and then some fast time on the part of the companies stationed at headquarters may be looked for; at present the street is in a very poor condition.—Truck No. 1, which was built by the Fire Extinguisher Manufacturing Company, has been sent to Seneca Falls to receive a general overhauling. The repairs will include a ninctv-fivc foot Gleason & Bailey ladder with ball bearings and ball-bearings for the wheels; as this truck is a very heavy one, weighing nearly six tons. The latter experiment will be watched with interest, and, if it proves a success, will be adopted throughout the department.—Instead of being compelled to take their furloughs during the summer season, the members of the department can now take them when they choose, or can take two vacations of five days each—of course, but one man from each company will be allowed away at any time.–House cleaning has been the order of the day up to Saturday last, but is now finished, and all the houses look like a model New England kitchen.—Engine companies 17 and 20, have very fine ball grounds, and the men are not slow to take advantage of them —A three-alarm fire kept several companies busy for over four hours on Sunday afternoon last. At 3.50 p. m., an alarm was sounded from box 351 followed soon after by second and third alarms, Kickel’s malt house was the scene of the blaze, which was a hot one while it lasted. Several narrow escapes were noted, and, as it was, Pipemen Heubner and Boehm, of engines Nos. 9 and 11. were injured, the former quite badly. Tillermen Cullen and Itoeberiiz. of trucks Nos. 2 and 3, were also slightly injured.

DETROIT FIRE NOTES.

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DETROIT FIRE NOTES.

[Special correspondence of FIRE AND WATER].

DETROIT MICH., April 28, 1897.

Friends of Commissioner Lennane tendered him a reception last week and presented him with a very handsome commissioner’s badge. Mr. Lennane is a general favorite throughout the department.—Dismissals, resignations and transfers have been quite numerous of late. W. H. Barkin, first assistant engineer of engine company 16 (fireboat), resigned on the 20th inst. in older to accept a responsible position with the company which operates the steel boats on the Erie canal. W. D. Dohany, second assistant, was promoted to fill the vacancy.—The five-day bill presented to the senate for consideration early in the session was passed by that body last week I anticipate an easy victory in the house, an.l the governor will undoubtedly indorse it. According to the provisions of the bill no expense can be incurred in the operation of it. The commission says it will cost the city a large amount of money; but the firemen say it will not, and they are right. —The department fared very well in the matter of estimates for the ensuing year. These include a truck and chemical company near Mount Elliott and Mack avenues, a new house for engine company 4, and pumps for the pipe line. The firemen also get their fur lough.— The hose carriage which has done service for many years in engine company 8, was recently replaced by a modern combination hose wagon and chemical; since receiving it the members of that company have demonstrated that tney are fire lighters in the fullest sense of the word,as they have downed several good sized fires without resorting to the aid of a big line.—The commission has adopted a new plan upon the suggestion of Captain I). W. Carroll (with whom the idea oiiginated) vith regard to the use of chemical engines. Hereafter, when the supply of water i 1 one of these engines has become exhausted and a large stream is not necessary, a two and one half-inch line is led from the steamer to the fire and reduced to the size of the chemical hose. This plan permits the use of all water necessary without any danger of the extensive damage being done that would be caused by using a large stream.