Device to Stop the Pollution of Water.

Device to Stop the Pollution of Water.

In his recent message to the State legislature of New York, Governor Hughes discussed at considerable length the pollution of rivers and streams, and, in doing so, pointed out the inadequacy of the laws on the subject and the great injury done to the natural resources of tne State, both in the destruction of fish and the poisoning of the water supply of the people. He said in part: “We have reached a time in the development of this State when proper measures for the protection of our streams are imperatively needed. We can no longer afford to permit the sewage of our cities and our industrial wastes to be poured into our watercourses, and the sooner we take suitable preventive measures, the easier it will be to attain the desired result.” This is being done effectually by the English government and with the co-operation of the people and manufacturers, as will be seen by the following report of R. B. Nicholls, United States deputy consul at Bradford, Yorkshire, one of the principal seats of woolen and cloth manufacture in England, where thousands of gallons of dye-waste from each mill pass hourly into the running waters and render them not only unfit for domestic purposes, but, also, sources of disease and death. A successful method has been discovered of rendering the water thus polluted, if not always free from discoloration, at all events free from poisonous acids and, therefore, altogether non-hurtful.

The method followed is thus described in the report of the deputy consul at Bradford: “The plant consists of three parts—an elevated tank carried on brick piers, an old 30-ft. boiler set at an angle of about 30°, and another old boiler converted into a filter and standing vertically on end, all of which are connected by pipes. The elevated tank is simply a wooden reservoir, about 20×10 ft., to hold about half a day’s quantity. Into this tank the crude dye-water is pumped, and here it receives an admixture of lime in the proportion of 3 or 4 lb. of dry lime to every 1,000 gal. of the liquor to be treated. From the tank the liquor is carried by a pipe to the bottom of the tilted boiler. The outlet from the boiler is at the top of the incline, and the liquor flows in at the bottom—therefore, against the whole weight of the contents of what is practically a cistern. It is in this device of using an inclined cistern from which all air is excluded for the purpose of a settling tank that the efficiency of the process consists.” The cost, it may be added, is one cent per 1,000 gal.

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