Divining Rod Tests in Paris

Divining Rod Tests in Paris

A report from Paris says: “The results of the first series of experiments with the divining rod before the Congress of Experimental Psychology this week are considered remarkable. The first tests were devoted to examining the diviners’ claims to be able to detect underground cavities. On Thursday four wielders of the mysterious rod were taken to a disused quarry in Vincennes Wood and were invited to point out the subterranean galleries and shafts and to show their direction. A large and distinguished number of scientists and members of the Ministry of Agriculture were present Armaud Yire, city surveyor, who was the only man who knew the exact position of the abandoned tunnels, tested the results. A peasant from South France was the first diviner. He carried a long, supple hazel wand with a forked end, which he kept near the ground, and walked forward, his wand trembling slightly. The fork suddenly twitched. The peasant announced that the cavity begins “here”; then indicated the limits of the cavity, adding “it is 50 feet deep and quite dry.” These details were found to be correct. An even better performance was that of another diviner, who gave the exact position of four underground galleries and estimated the depth of each gallery within an inch. Another pointed to a subterranean spring. As a final test the diviner who pointed to the four galleries allowed himself to be led to the same ground blindfolded, with the same result. Besides the classical hazelwood whalebone, bamboo and copper were among the materials used for the wands. In the afternoon there were tests of diviners claiming to locate metal. In the garden of the Chateau Mirabeau, outside Paris, a mass of copper was buriqd at one point and iron at another in such a way that it was impossible to tell that the ground had been disturbed. The competitors told of the existence of the buried metals. Yesterday tests of waterfinding were made at Sartrouville, where two springs, the positions of which were only known to the judge, were sought, as well as the water supply of the city, which passes under the district. Although conditions were made difficult by had weather, the results are considered conclusive, the competitors having not only shown the positions ol the springs, but also their approximate output.”

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