DO IRON ROOFS PROTECT?

DO IRON ROOFS PROTECT?

A recent fire in San Francisco, Cal., raises the question as to the advisability of the employment of iron roofs for warehouses. The Stockton grain warehouse, a brick building,was so protected. A fire started in it near the cleaning machinery in No. 5, separated from the Crown mills by No. 6, a brick warehouse owned by those mills. Nos. 5 and 6 communicated with each other by tin-sheathed doors. The brick fire wall between Nos. 5 and 6, and the California Navigation and Investment Company’s iron warehouse confined the fire to the first two. Bevond is Farmers’ Union No. 7 500 feet long and 150 wide. All of these warehouses except the brick portions, are bui|t on piles ten to fifteen feet from the ground. If No. 5 had had a shingle, instead of at? iion roof, the fire department could have located the fire, in which case a few thousand dollars instead of nearly half a million of dollars would have covered the loss. As it was,the iron roof kept the water from the fire like a turtle back, and while the powerful pumps of the Crown mills, under the able direction of Capt. J. M. Welch, held the fire from No. 6. and the department and the brick wall kept it out of the California Navigation warehouse on the other side, Nos. 5 and 6 burned like Nebuchadnezzar’s fiery furnace. The work of the firemen was about equal to pouring water on the outside of a strong iron safe to put out a fire raging within ts walls. The consideration as to makirg use of such a style of roofing is a serious one. since from the Crown mills down the Stockton channel is a continuous range of brick and corrugated warehouses. If the whole line had burned.a million dollars would not have covered the insurance loss.

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