Drill of Newark Firemen

Drill of Newark Firemen

Every phase of work done by firemen in fighting a fire was demonstrated in an exhibition given last week in Newark, N. J., by a selected number of men at the training school of the fire department. The fire commissioners and officers of the department were present at the exhibition, as was also former Chief Edward F. Croker, of New York. Mr. Crokcr complimented the men on their work. Although the exhibition was “make believe.’’ it embodied as much realism as it is possible to give without fire. Lives were “saved” and men were lowered at great personal “risk.” What especially impressed the fire commissioners. Chief Moore and Mr. Crokcr. was the fact that not a hitch marred the proceedings. The 15 men who participated were in charge of Lieutenant 1’etcr F. McKiernan. of engine company No. 2. and were selected because they had trained al the school last year. Within 15 minutes of the sounding of the alarm the men finished the five numbers prepared for them for outside work. They did their work in front of the reserve stables in Prospect street. As the first number, each man had to station himself at the proper place to perform the work that would be required in case of a real fire. The second number required the raising and lowering of aerial ladders. The third number called for the carrying of lines of hose to the roof by stairway and ladder. Other lines had to be carried to the roof from the outside of the building, and had to be secured to the cornice with the approved knots. An especially difficult feature that was accomplished with dexterity was the taking out of a “burst” length of hose between the second and third floors and street and roof. The fourth number consisted in the taking up and the lowering of large ladders to and from the roof. Scaling ladders were used by the men. and passages were made from window to window by means of these ladders. The firemen had to carry a live man from the roof to the street while sliding down a rope, and the sealing ladders were used to carry persons down from roof or window. “Dead” and “unconscious victims” were also used in the drill. One feature was an exhi bition of first aid to the injured. This included a telephone call to the public service offices and the sending of the “pulmotor” by the company. This machine, which gives artificial respiration, was attached to an “unconscious” man Spectators were interested in the use of the life guns One was discharged and a life line was shot to the roof of the building, or to a window, and was secured by a fireman, who lowered himself to the ground by means of the rope. The lifenets were freely used. The eighth number on the program w’as an exhibition in the proper sending in of alarms. Officers illustrated how additional calls arc telegraphed to headquarters when the occasion required. The last numb, r was the taking up of everything. The commandant had to account for each man and for equipment and report to the officer in charge that he was ready to return to quarters. Among the spectators was a committee on fire hazards from the board of trade. The exhibition marked the opening of the training school for the season. There will lie instruction every morning and afternoon from now until December 15. and from February 15 to May 1. An entire company is instructed each morning.

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