DRIVEN WELLS FOR BROOKLYN.

DRIVEN WELLS FOR BROOKLYN.

It is expected that a chain of driven wells from a point near Jamaica eastwards into Nassau county for a distance of fifteen miles will enable the officials of the water department of New York city to determine within a short time whether there are streams flowing under Long Island big enough to furnish an inexhaustible supply to the borough of Brooklyn for all time, and possibly furnish a large part of the water consumed in Manhattan. There are to be more than 200 of these wells when the chain is completed. At present nearly 100 have been driven and are in operation. From these 36,000,000 gals, of water are pumped daily to the Ridgewood reservoir in Brooklyn. It is estimated that the daily supply from the wells, when all are completed, will be about 75,000,000 gals. By studying the flow at these wells, which are down to depths varying from 130 to 170 ft., the engineers expect to obtain sufficient data to enable them to say definitely whether or not the supply is from a stream of water flowing from the mainland, through underground channels. The wells in operation are located at St. Albans, Aqueduct, Roscdale, Massapequa. Spring Creek, Forest Stream and Clear Stream. At each of these places new wells are being driven, and twenty are going down at Morris Park, near Jamaica. Chief Engineer McKay, who is considered an authority on the water supply of Long Island, does not believe that that territory is underlain by a big underground stream. He asserts that the borings afford no evidence of such a thing, and, further, he does not believe that Long Island will ever supply water to Manhattan. On the other hand, his opinion is that the time will come when Brooklyn will have to go to the Catskills for its supply. That borough now consumes on an average 126,000,000 gals, of water a day. At the present rale of growth in the population the daily average consumption is increasing 10,000,000 gals, each year. The supply can, of course, he increased to a certain extent in Queens and Nassau counties; but the limit will soon be reached. If the city is permitted to drive wells in Suffolk county, he thinks it could increase the supply by about 120,000,000 gals, a day. But, even if the city could get into Suffolk county, he claims that the demand would equal the supply in twenty years, if the population continued to increase at its present rate, so the idea of Long Island furnishing water to Manhattan is out of the question. Meanwhile. Engineer Titus continues increasing the flow from the Jameco wells.

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