Driven Wells for Fire Protection.

Driven Wells for Fire Protection.

A deficient water supply is one of the greatest difficulties encountered by Firemen, especially in the smaller towns and villages, and in city suburbs there is frequently a large area entirely unprotected. In such cases, where the soil admits, for cheapness and efficiency nothing can equal the driven well. Having previously printed articles upon this subject, we are asked to give the method by which these wells can be put down. We therefore give a leaf from the practical experience of a town where it seemed almost impossible to procure a water supply, which difficulty was entirely overcome by the adoption of driven wells.

At Cortland, N, Y., where a large number are in use, the following methods of con struction are employed: A temporary curb ing of wood, about eight feet square, is sunk into the ground until water is reached usually at a depth of from ten to sixteen feet. The pipe used is ordinary six-inch wrought iron tubing, and should be in sections about eighteen feet in length. A coni cal cast iron point is fitted into the lower end of the pipe, the largest diameter being a little greater than that of the pipe itself, thereby diminishing the friction while driving. This point extends into the pipe a short dis tance, and is riveted in place. About four feet of the pipe just above the point is per forated with inch holes, about one inch apart each way, thus giving ample room for the entrance of the water. A cast iron “driving head” is next screwed in.to a coup ling on the other end, care being taken that this is screwed down until it rests solidly upon the top of the pipe. The tube thus pre pared is placed in the pit and firmly secured in an upright position. An ordinary pile driver, having a wooden hammer, weighing about 800 lbs., is used. The pipe is driven down as far as possible, thus giving at least fifteen feet of water. The driving head is then removed, a short piece of pipe, sur rounded by a hydrant post, is screwed in, the pit filled up, and the well is complete. By this means the necessity of driving upon a coupling or joint is avoided, thereby greatly reducing the chance of failure. It will generally be found advisable to clean the well Out thoroughly before using. For this purpose a sand pump is used. In this manner excellent wells can be constructed for from $100 to $150 each. When the soil is so compact as to render the construction of the single tube well impracticable, gang wells, tormed by the union of several smaller tubes, may be substituted.

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