Effective Use of Chemical Extinguishers

Effective Use of Chemical Extinguishers

Kenotin Farm, the fine summer home of F. W. Sessions at Washington Mills near Utica, N. Y., was wholly destroyed by fire at 1.30 P. M., February 19 with an estimated loss of $20,000. The house contained 12 rooms filled with valuable old furniture, a large library, and costly pictures. The wind was blowing hard, which assisted the flames. The building was in charge of a caretaker, who notified Mr. Sessions at Utica and he arrived quickly on the scene in his automobile. He at once telephoned the O. J. Childs Company, chemical fire apparatus builders at Utica, and that company dispatched men with fourteen chemical extinguishers and a 40 gallon tank. The force arrived too late to save the residence but it succeeded in saving several adjoining farm buildings which would have surely been destroyed but for its timely arrival, and the efficiency of the chemical fire appliances employed.

The importance attaching to this item is that in cases of fire in isolated dwelling the automobile and chemical extinguishers may be relied upon to do effective work. Had the caretaker notified the Childs Company in time no doubt much of the valuable property destroyed would have been saved. Owners of buildings, whether inside the fire department zone or outside, should be equipped with extinguishers as in the case referred to above. The only chance to save property is by the immediate use of such appliances. It is foolish policy trusting to luck where lives and valuable belongings have to be protected.

The Washington Fire Engine Company of Wilmington. Del., has decided to send its steam fire engine to the American & British Manufacturing Company, at Providence. R. I., to be fitted with chassis, gasoline electric engine, new boiler and the pumps that have been in use. The engine will he of 40 horse power and the machine will be able to negotiate a 15 per cent, grade without difficultv. It is to be delivered some time in May. The company has also placed an order with the Martin Carriage Company of York. Pa., for the construction of a chemical engine, not unlike the one now in use.

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