ELECTRIC PUMP FOR UTAH LAKE.

ELECTRIC PUMP FOR UTAH LAKE.

Utah lake in the Great Salt Lake valley, Utah, is the feeder of the five large and several small canals which furnish water for irrigation purposes in that valley. The companies which own these canals have the right, by agreement with the adjacent land owners, to raise the water to a compromise level at a point three feet one inch above the low water mark. The lake, which is about thirty miles from Salt Lake City, and has an area of 93,000 acres, is fed for the most part by the streams which flow into it from the American, Spanish, and Provo’s canyons, and has but the one outlet, the Jordan river, which empties into the Great Salt lake some miles to the north of it. In consequence of droughts and the great demands made upon it for irrigation purooses, Utah lake is three feet lower than the compromise level already mentioned; hence, its discharge is under seventy-five cubic feet per second— not enough to supply the wants of the various canal companies during the months of June, July, and August, when irrigation operations are carried on. To remedy these conditions, therefore, what is probably the largest electrical pumping engine in the world, and is certainly one of the largest pumping plants to be found anywhere has been installed on the shore of Utah lake, at the head of the Jordan river, by means of which the lake water is to be lifted into the river, whence it will he distributed into the various canals. The foundation of this plant is of piles and timber, to obtain which a tight dam was built. The plant itself comprises four forty-inch special, low-runnings, doublesuction, centrifugal, Byron-Jackson pumps, independently driven and each weighing nearly twelve tons. A forty-inch suction feeds them and the discharge is forty-eight inches. The pumping capacity is 100 cubic feet per second under a head of four feet five inches—the total capacity in twenty-four hours being in the neighborhood of 65,000,000. The power for each pump is brought a distance of twelve miles.

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