ENGBERG ELECTRO-HYDRAULIC VALVE

ENGBERG ELECTRO-HYDRAULIC VALVE

THE ENGBERG ELECTRO-HYDRAULIC VALVE.

Much may be accomplished in the saving of time and relief from anxiety in having proper waterworks appliances employed in connection with the management of plants. Probably one of the most important devices that ought to be used in all well equiped systems is the Engberg valve. It is so simple and easily operated that any waterworks system having a standpipe or reservoir, cannot well afford to be without it. It is most valuable as increasing the effectiveness when fire pressure is desired and permitting a reduction in the cost of maintaining ordinary domestic pressure. For places where it is necessary to open or close large gate valves often, this valve is far more serviceable than those operated by gears or worm as it has no spindles, screws or nuts to wear out. Another important consideration is that these valves are easy to operate, being controled by a small hand lever which can be extended above ground in places where they are not conveniently located. Electric controlling devices can be attached to them any time after they have been installed, if desired. The Engberg valves are no experiment, as they have been in use for a long time and are the result of years of careful study and experience, and are recommended by fire underwriters everywhere. Switchboards and batteries are furnished with the valves, so that they do not depend on other sources for electric current. They are thoroughly tested and ready to set in the mains before shipment is made, and there are no motors to contend with; nothing but a simple controlling device operated by the batteries furnished with each valve. Following is a description of the Engberg valve, with accompanying illustrations. The gate valve is operated by a hydraulic cylinder, which is supplied by water from either side of the gate and always from the side where the pressure is the highest. I’lie regulating valve consists of a flat valve which is operated by a piston. The piston is moved by releasing the pressure on either side by means of small poppet valves which are raised from their seats by an armature and magnet. A switchboard is furnished with every valve having a single pole double throw switch and an alarm bell. The upper contact on the switch operates the valve, and the lower is for the bell, which will ring only. when the valve is closed or opened This depends on how the connections arc made, and the operator can at all times ascertain as to what position the valve is in. If the valve is connected so that the bell will ring when the valve is closed, and the operator closes the bell circuit, and the bell will not ring, he will readily understand the valve is open, if he closes the valve circuit, or upper pole of switch for a few seconds, and again closes the lower or bell cir cuit and the bell rings, he will understand the valve is closed. The valve can be operated by hand simply by lifting the small armature on the controlling device. Dampness will not affect ibis valve, and it can be placed in any position. Every valve is furnished with batteries, and does not depend on the electric current from any other source. The switchboard and batteries are placed at the pumping station or any place where the valve is to be operated; from here run two lines of No. 8 iron or No. 12 copper wire to the valve and make connections as shown in the dia gram. Different styles of valves are furnished; bell, flanged or spigot end. F’or valves that are in the mains, electric-hydraulic attachments are furnished; but it is best to furnish the complete valve, as this guarantees the necessary test to be made before shipping. In placing orders be sure to state distance to be operated on, under what pressure, what position, and the style of valve wanted. As bearing testimony to the value of these valves and the convenience experienced by using them, the Engberg company has received a large number of letters from waterworks managers and others, which are printed in a neat pamphlet it has issued. Among these John Lindt, chief of the St. Joseph, Mich., fire department, says: ‘‘Your electric shut-off valve has been a great assistance to ns in putting out fires, as it enables the engineer at the pumping station to increase the water pressure in an instant, whereas it took front twenty to thirty minutes to change before the same was put in; a man having to go to the standpipe and close the valve and also telephone to the engineer notifying him of the same. Now it is all done at the pumping station, and by the time we are able to make connections we have direct pressure. Any chief knows what it means to try and fight lire without sufficient water pressure.” Another testimonial from W. Marean, superintendent of waterworks, Belvidere, HI., says: “The two electric valves purchased from you are working perfectly and have never failed to operate. They enable us to increase our pressure from standpipe pressure to direct pressure in one minute. 1 cannot see how they could be bettered.” These are samples of many other recommendations printed in the pamphlet. An important feature in the Engberg valve is that it may be operated at long distances, and where this is necessary it proves of great value. The company will ship valves to responsible people and allow ample time to test them, and if found not satisfactory, they may be returned at the manufacturers’ expense. Pamphlets describing the valve ntav be had by addressing Engberg’s Electric and Mechanical Works, St. Joseph, Mich.

SECTIONS ENGBERG ELECTRO-HYDRAULIC VALVECIRCUIT PLAN CONNECTING ENGBERG VALVE.

No posts to display