ENGINEERING ASSOCIATION OF THE SOUTH.

ENGINEERING ASSOCIATION OF THE SOUTH.

The regular monthly meeting of the association was held on the evening of January 10, at Vanderbilt University. Messrs. John P. Willoughby, Henry F. Wilson, and Wm. Huey, of Birmingham, Ala., were elected to active membership, and several applications for membership were received.

The first paper of the evening was a description of the methods of doing some bridge pier and foundation work in Chemulpo, Korea, by W. H. Holmes, an American engineer who has recently returned from that country. The system of keeping records of rivers in that ancient country was briefly described. They extend back into the past for many centuries, and are said to be very accurate. Mr. Holmes stated that where an opportunity offered itself for a check the records were in every cnee sustained. The record for the river In question extended back 509 years, and explanation was made at tue beginning of the records that the history of the river previous to that time had been consumed in a fire which had burned the house and all contents.

The second paper of the evening was presented by Mr. Julian W Kendrick, city engineer of Birmingham, Ala. It was an exhaustive study of the sewerage problem now confronting the Birmingham district. The geographical features of the drainage area were described, the difficulties set forth to carrying out the various methods of sewerage, and, finally, a plan proposed.

ENGINEERING ASSOCIATION OF THE SOUTH.

ENGINEERING ASSOCIATION OF THE SOUTH.

The regular monthly meeting of the Engineering Association of the South, was held on the evening of April 12, at Vanderbilt university, Nashville, Tenn. In the absence of both the president and vicepresident, Mr. Hunter McDonald was called upon to preside.

The first paper of the evening, entitled “Sketching topography with the traverse table,” was read by Mr. R. L. Lund. This method was presented in a clear and interesting manner, comparison being made with the methods now commonly in use—the conclusions reached by the writer being that this method was more accurate, rapid, more easily adapted to varying conditions, and cheaper than the methods now commonly in vogue. Discussion of the paper was postponed until next meeting. The next feature of the program was a lecture by Dr. W. L. Dudley on the subject of “Liquefaction of gases.” A brief history of the matter was given, explaining how in earlier times there were certain gases supposed to be permanent; but the discovery of the simple law of Charles and Gay-Lussac, convinced scientists that all gases could be liquefied, if the proper temperature and pressure could be secured. This led to numerous experiments, with the result that many of the supposably permanent gases were brought to the liquid state, and the recent development of a machine, simple in construction and operation, whereby air is liquefied, has caused the subject to become a vital one to the public. The varied fields of usefulness of liquefied gases were spoken of, and the possibilities for an increasing demand for such seem certain. Dr. Dudley performed a number of interesting experiments with liquefied carbon dioxide, showing how easily mercury could be frozen into a hammer, and how quickly one’s hand could be blistered by a temperature of 160 below zero Fahr. The lecture was not only entertaining, but contained much information for all whose privilege it was to listen thereto. A vote of thanks w’as tendered Dr. Dudley and Mr. Lund for their contribution to the entertainment and instruction of the association, whose annual summer outing will be a visit to the plant of the American Phosphate company at Mount Pleasant, Tenn.