FACTORY FIRE IN NEW YORK.

FACTORY FIRE IN NEW YORK.

On the night of December 9 sixty firemen had a very narrow escape from death in a three-alarm fire which destroyed over $100,000 worth of property—at Nos. 186-188 Wooster street. Manhattan, and in the adjoining buildings While they were fighting the flames on the fourth floor the roof and fifth floor caved in on them. A captain and two firemen were buried in the debris and would have died, if their comrades had not bravely remained to dig them out. As the firemen retreated to the floor below, the rest of the upper structure fell. The building was occupied by manufacturing concerns. A watchman saw smoke issuing from an upper window and turned in an alarm. The fire spread rapidly, and apparatus was brought from the entire lower section of the city. To get at the fire, which was in the rear, the firemen had to force their way through buildings on Greene and Bleecker streets, and considerable property loss occurred in these buildings from water. Public School No. 125 adjoined the burned building on the south and a small old dwellinghouse. occupied, but soon vacated by four families,, stood to the north. While Battalion Chief Worth was on the fourth floor directing the work of three engine companies, Captain Sullivan, of engine No. 13 took his men into the fiercest part of the blaze. While there, he and his men heard the rumbling sound of rending timbers, and, before any of them could escape, the huge water tank came crashing down from the roof through the fifth floor, followed by blazing woodwork. Capt Sullivan and Firemen Ryan and McSherrv, all of engine company No. 13 were caught under the wreckage. Pieces of flooring and even bricks from the walls continued to fall on the heap, and there was every indication that the • building was about to collapse. In face of this great danger Battalion Chief Worth and Captain Griffith, of engine No. 25 ordered their men to the rescue. The three firemen, fortunately for themselves, had fallen near the edge of the debris and were soon dug out. Fireman McSherry was so seriously injured that he had to be carried down stairs, the other two being able to walk with support. The noise of the falling roof had been heard in the street, and, lest the entire building should go down, all of the firemen were ordered to the street, and just in time. A the last members of the eight engine companies rushed outside, another floor fell, and the rear wall caved in down to the first floor. Owing to the low water pressure the denartment was greatly handicapped in fighting the fire. Four of the largest engines to each the water towers were able to raise only from 80 to 85 lbs. pressure, instead of the normal 150 lbs. This difficulty lasted for twenty minutes and enabled the fire to gain headway.

FACTORY FIRE IN NEW YORK.

0

FACTORY FIRE IN NEW YORK.

A fire broke out on the night of February 12 in the five-story brick building on the corner of Tenth avenue and Fifty-second street, Manhattan, New York. The flames were discovered on the third floor on the Tenth avenue side in the Braunmuller piano factory and made such headway in a few minutes as to involve the two floors above it, occupied by the R. M. Bent piano factory. These three floors were completely gutted, and a saloon and confectionery store on the ground floor were badly damaged by water and smoke. Michael Stevens, driver for Battalion Chief Duffy, the wearer of a Stevenson medal for saving three lives at a lire last year, was badly cut by flying glass when a window blew out. The factory had been left apparently all safe at 6 o’clock p. m., and was empty when the fire broke out. The loss was heavy.