Facts About Gasoline

Facts About Gasoline

The following are extracts from a gasoline bulletin issued by the Fire Prevention Committee, Rochester, N. Y. The suggestions advanced should be of particular interest to every housewife:

“A pint of gasoline left open in a basin in a room at a normal or average temperature will entirely evaporate in twenty-four hours. The gasoline vapor is heavier than the air and sinks immediately to the floor, and unless it is disturbed by active air currents will remain in the room for many hours. One pint of gasoline will make two hundred cubic feet of explosive mixture. Without becoming too scientific, it may be said that this gasoline vapor is several times more powerful than gunpowder. Every gasoline explosion and fire that occurs in the home is due to ignorance and carelessness on the part of the user. Gloves must be cleaned, fabrics must be dipped in gasoline or alcohol. For that reason it is vitally important that the user should have all the information possible about the danger incurred. Gasoline should be used in open air wherever possible, but if it must be used in the house, all the windows should be opened wide and a sufficient draft created to drive all the vapor from the room. It is almost criminal to use gasoline in the kitchen or other rooms where it is exposed to fire. The vapor has been known to jump thirty feet from a tank in the open air and explode with such violence as to wreck the tank car and burn all the buildings in the immediate neighborhood. It is not necessary to touch a match to it. A spark from the heel of a shoe striking a tack or nail will explode the vapor. A lighted gas jet will produce the same result. Keep gasoline away from every kind of flame, even if that flame is enclosed as in a furnace or stove. Articles dipped, washed or soaked in gasoline give off an explosive vapor_ for hours after. They should be thoroughly aired before being used and always kept away from exposed flame.

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