Facts about Hose.

Facts about Hose.

Rubber goods manufacturers generally make over a score of different grades of hose, some cheap and which will satisfy certain needs, while others are more expensive, and are really required for the purposes intended. It is not necessary, of course, to have a line of air hose for use in the garden, and vice versa, the article for domestic use would be of little value elsewhere. A conducting hose of two-ply will answer every purpose where only a slight pressure is used, but lift that to seventy-five pounds per square inch and three-ply is at once demanded. Then the engine hose must be four, five and sixply, and, of course, much more expensive. Then some grades are perfected by the use of superior stock, both in rubber and duck.

F’lorists require a heavy hose, as well as do brewers, tanners and those who force oil through it. An eight-ply is frequently used. For air drills great care is used in both duck and rubber, and canvas, wire or marline is wrapped around this variety. For air brakes the genius of the rubber trade has been at work for years, and when it is understood that railroad trains are lengthened from year to year, the conclusion can be readily reached that there is room yet at the top for this, an improvement in the quality that gives s rength. In suctions there are many varieties used for fire, wrecking, dredging, sand, etc. Some of these are large enough in circumference to allow the crawling through of a full-sized man.

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