Fall River Water Supply

Fall River Water Supply

The Providence “Journal” says: “Now Fall River is joining Providence and other New England cities in pressing plans for increasing its water supply and protecting it from contamination. The report of the Watuppa Ponds and Ouequechan River Commission to the Board of Aldermen of Fall River advises an expenditure of nearly $3,000,000, a considerable part of which will be returned in betterments. The estimated net cost of $1,142,505 to the city does not appear to be excessive for a water supply that is above suspicion. The problem in Fall River is made more difficult by the fact that the owners of the mills have riparian rights which must be taken into account. Sanitary improvements also will add to the expenditure. If, as stated, the commission has covered all the points at issue— drainage, water rights, filling flats, preventing pollution and increasing the supply—the city can well afford to go ahead with the improvements. Discussion of the plan will show whether or not it needs amending, but if the main features are well worked out nothing is to be gained by long-continued wrangling over minor details.

FALL RIVER WATER SUPPLY.

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FALL RIVER WATER SUPPLY.

Fine Showing of a Metered City.

(SPECIALLY WHITTEN FOR FIRE AND WATER.)

Fall River, Bristol county, Mass., a city of 107,831 inhabitants, is situated on the east side of Mount Hope bay, an arm of Narrangansett bay, and is built on irregular ground, which at some points is 260 feet above the level of the sea. As one of the largest manufacturing cities in New England it, of course, depends very much upon its water supply for its many mills being successfully carried on. The source of this supply is VVatuppa lake, situated 129.4 feet above tide-water. Its area is 3.478; watershed, 15,522 acres; storage capacity, 10,000,000,000 gallons; mean daily discharge, 35,000,000 gallons.

The waterworks were built by the city in 1871-74 for a population of 26,766 from the designs of W. J. McAlpine. The system is pumping through mains to standpipes forty-two inches in diameter and sixty and eighty feet high respectively, each inclosed in masonry towers and two tanks, one, with a capacity of 1,160,000 gallons, seventy-three by thirty-seven feet, 305 feet above tide-water, the other, with capacity of 1,390,000 gallons, sixty-five by fifty-six feet, iron eleven-sixteenths of an inch plates at bottom, five-sixteenths of an inch at top, reinforced with angle iron at top. The engine house, built on a cofferdam on the west shore of the lake, is of granite; the engine room is fifty-six by eighty feet, and thirty-four feet high; the boiler room, twenty-three by fifty-three and a half feet; chimney, 112 feet high. The gate-house is eight by ten feet, with floor ten feet below the surface. The water is conducted by an arched conduit six feet wide and four feet high to the engine house, where it divides into branches leading to the several pump wells. The pumping engines were built by Henry R. Worthington, Manhattan, New York, compound, condensing, capacity 5,000,000 gallons, and Davidson Steam Pump company, Brooklyn, New York, 5,000,000 gallons and 8,000,000—total pumping capacity in twenty-four hours, 18,000,000 gallons. The total pumpage for 1901 was 1,320,839.810 gallons, or a daily average of 3,618,739 gallons, as compared with 1,388,776,336 gallons. or a daily average of 3.804,867 gallons, for the year 1900. On the accompanying diagrams will be found the rise and fall of the lake water pumped and rainfall; also showing variations in consumption of water per consumer per day. For domestic uses, manufacturing and trade purposes 698,475,129 metered gallons were consumed, unmetered, 68,750,000, five per cent, loss of registration in meters, 34,923,757; for public uses, including schools (21,126,706 gallons), fires (26,175,000 gallons), etc., enough to make up a total of 1,069,914,216 gallons accounted for, there being still 250,925,594 gallons or 19.32 per cent, unaccounted for. The total length of pipe (cast iron, six to twenty-four inch.) now laid in the city is 476,765 feet; hydrants, 991; gates, 986. The average pressure is eighty pounds. The total number of services (lead one-half-inch to two-inch) is 7,075: meters, 6.755. The meters in use are of the following tvpes: Crown, 3,307; Hersey (disk, 2,013), 2,841; Thomson. 408; Union rotary, 130; Lambert, twentyseven: Trident, twenty: Gem, twelve: Ball & Fitts (piston), seven: Torrent, three. The meter service, including repairs, inspector’s salary, etc., for the year amounted to $4,576.58, and the whole expenditure for 1901. inclusive of $93,340 interest paid, was $139,482.36: the receipts were $168,034.17, of which $159.057.74 was derived from water rates; from schedule rates. $3,946.07. The amount of coal burned was 1.824 tons; gallons pumped per pound of coal, 323.14: income per gallon in cents, 12-1000; per centage of ashes in actual weight, 10.49; average head in feet, 185.76.

DIAGRAM SHOWING VARIATIONS IN CONSUMPTION OF WATER PER CONSUMER PER DAY.DIAGRAM SHOWING RATIO BETWEEN WATER ACCOUNTED FOR AND TOTAL AMOUNT PUMPED.

The organisation of the Fall River waterworks is as follows: Watuppa water board—Joseph Watters (president) ; William B. Hawes; Nathan B. Everett; clerk and water registrar, William W. Robertson; superintendent, Patrick Kieran; chief engineer, Patrick H. Olys.