Fiftieth Annual Water Report of New Bedford

Fiftieth Annual Water Report of New Bedford

The fiftieth report of the water department of New Bedford, Mass., has been presented by Superintendent R. C. P. Coggeshall and shows a satisfactory and progressive administration. The population of the city was 109,568 in 1915 and the system supplied a total of 3,522,453,626 gallons, the comsumption for the year 1919. The average daily consumption was 9,650,557 and the average per capita, 78 gallons daily. The cost of supplying water is computed at $43.81 per million gallons and the total cost including interest on bonds was $63.92. The percentage of water metered is 86 and the percentage of services metered is 95.8. The system is municipally owned and water was first introduced in 1869. From that time until July 10, 1899, the supply was taken from a storing reservoir artificially formed by constructing a dam across the valley of the Acushnet River, seven miles north of the centre of the City. This supply was augmented by a connection made in 1886 with Little Quittacas Pond. Since July 10, 1899, the whole supply has been taken from Great and Little Quittacas Ponds, eleven miles north of the centre of the city.

Previous to that date, the water flowed by gravity from the Acushnet Storing Reservoir (grade 40 + high water New Bedford Harbor) through a brick conduit 3 feet wide, 4 feet high, 5 6-10 miles long to a receiving reservoir (capacity 3 million gallons; grade 30′) located opposite the Purchase Street Pumping Station. Thence it was pumped into the Mt. Peasant Distributing Reservoir (capacity 15 million gallons; grade 154′) located 1,879 feet distant, from whence it flowed by gravity into the city’s distributing system. Since July 10, 1899, the entire supply has been pumped from Little Quittacas Pond (grade 52′ through a 48-inch steel force main 8 1/4 miles long) to a distributing reservoir (capacity 67 million gallons; grade 216′) located upon High Hill, in the town of Dartmouth. From this reservoir it flows into the city’s distributing system by gravitation through two 36-inch cast iron pipes averaging 4 1-17 miles in length. The first named system is not now in use, but is held in reserve to meet any emergency which might occur..

In his report Superintendent Coggeshall calls attention to the fact that the force main which supplies High Hill reservoir from the Quittacas pumping station has been for twenty years in continuous service and that, although it is still apparently in good condition, its age admonishes that a duplication should soon be secured. He points out that the daily consumption has now reached a point where it would not he possible to store more than a week’s supply. The improvements recommended by the superintendent would cost about $1,500,000 and should be started as soon as possible.

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