FILTERS FOR FARMS.

FILTERS FOR FARMS.

For farmers who cannot afford a better style of filter a very good one for surface water can be made of any suitable receptacle, such as a tank or water butt, on the bottom of which should be laid fairly large pebbles or broken stones to a depth of six inches, then over this a six-inch layer of course gravel; over this nine inches of fine gravel; and, finally, a layer of clean, sharp sand to a depth of ten or tewelve inches. A top layer about three inches of fresh sand added from time to time will keep the filter in good working order throughout the season. But it should be thoroughly cleansed and fresh material provided at least once a year. The water for use should be run off from the bottom of the filter by means of a draw tap or syphon into another vessel kept for service purposes.

Contrasting the consideration paid to locomotive engines with, that accorded to human beings, the Wheelock, N. Dak, Tribune says: “People may be willing to drink impure water; but they are not willing to offer it to their locomotives. Purified water results in sure economy and excellent business returns from the viewpoint of the locomotive operations, and, also, relieves the shops and roundhouses of a vast amount of work, which increases with the weight of locomotives and the increased demand upon them. Although the first cost is large, returns are so prompt and so liberal that to do without water purification is pronounced folly.”

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