FILTRATION AND NON-FILTRATION—A CONTRAST.

FILTRATION AND NON-FILTRATION—A CONTRAST.

Typhoid fever continues to be prevalent in West Philadelphia—the result, undoubtedly, of the impure and contaminated water supply furnished by the Schuylkill river. It is to be hoped that no long tarrying will be made—there has been more than enough delay already—in erecting the filtration plant for the city, so as to reduce the typhoid death rate to at least the same level as that of other cities where the water supply is filtered before it is delivered to the citizens. To take Albany, N. Y., as a typical instance of the condition of things before and after the water supply was filtered: In that city, tinder the old condition of unfiltered water, the average death rate from typhoid was eightyfour every year. The city has now one district which is supplied with nothing but filtered water. In that section there were only seven deaths from that disease. In another district, where the supply is part filtered and part unfiltered. the mortality from the same cause was eight: of imported cases there were eight. That is to say: The deaths were reduced by two-thirds, with the filtering system only partially in operation; the probabilities being all in favor of a much larger reduction, as soon is the whole system is completed and utilised. Of themselves these figures speak volumes in favor of filtration. The moral as applied to Philadelphia and Pittsburgh is obvious.

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