FILTRATION AT KANSAS CITY, KAS.

FILTRATION AT KANSAS CITY, KAS.

As has already been announced in FIRE AND WATER, the O. H. Jewell Filter Company, of Chicago, is building a filter plant at Kansas City, Kas., in which the water of the Missouri river will be subjected to a cleansing process.

The filter house will be fifty feet wide and 165 feet long, and will contain ten large gravity filters, with a capacity of 6,000,000 gallons in the twentyfour hours, and, when fully completed, will represent a value of $1,000,000. After this’plant has been installed.it will cost little more to pump filtered water to consumers than it did to pump muddy water. It is not proposed to use coagulants, only pure sand, in the filtration process. Instead of being taken directly from the lake into the gravity filters, the water at Quindaro will pass through a tank holding 500,000 gallons, which will remove a large percentage of sedimentary matter before it enters the filters, whence it could be pumped directly into the city mains. Instead of this, however, the Metropolitan Water Company will have a clear water storage reservoir at Quindaro, covering an area of 150 by 300 feet. This will provide sufficient storage capacity to prevent an interruption in the daily supply, owing to accidents or in case of large fires At the property of the Metropolitan Water Company on the west bank of the Missouri river, adjoining the big reservoir that was purchased by Kansas City, Mo., ground has been broken for the storage reservoir. The company is also preparing to receive the new 8,ooo.coo-gallon low service pump, which will cost $30,000. The company will discontinue taking water from the reservoir owned by Kansas City, Mo., by December 7, or not later than January 1. The Kaw point pumping station will be abandoned, and the pmps will be rebuilt for use at Quindaro.

FILTRATION AT KANSAS CITY, KAS.

FILTRATION AT KANSAS CITY, KAS.

The Metropolitan Water Company of Kansas City, Kas., has contracted with the O. H. Jewell Filter Company, of Chicago, for a gravity filter plant, with a capacity of 6,000,000 gallons daily. This will be the first attempt by a public company to purify the waters of the M ississippi river. The results of the experiment will be watched with great interest.