FILTRATION

FILTRATION

Surgeon General Hugh S. Cummings, head of the United States Public Health Service, recently said, in reference to the shortage of purifying supplies caused by lack of cars:

The cities of Gadsden, Ala., and Attalla, which are supplied by the Gadsden water works, have found the water contaminated and Attalla shut off the Gadsden supply and went back to the use of a large spring formerly used by the town but abandoned for two years. Analyses were made of the spring water and it was pronounced to be “highly contaminated and unfit for drinking purposes,” colon bacilli having been found. Gadsden has arranged to put in a modern chlorination plant in order to correct the conditions complained of.

“Officers of the United States Public Health Service view the situation with alarm, as do health officers throughout the country. The summer is always a critical time for dealing with water borne diseases, for the demands made on municipal water systems are then so great, that usually every available source of water has to be utilized. In very few places in the United States have large cities a water supply which does not need to be artificially purified before it is safe for drinking purposes, the usual method being mechanical filtration with alum and disinfection with chlorine. With these chemicals practically unobtainable, due to the railroad situation, it may soon be impossible to furnish pure water in some of the largest American cities. During the last ten years purification with alum and chlorine has been the greatest single factor in the control of typhoid fever. Unless railroads find it possible immediately to transport the necessary materials to the cities the most serious consequences in the form of epidemics of typhoid fever are to be apprehended.”

FILTRATION

FILTRATION

A bill is before the Massachusetts legislature whose purpose is to prevent the pollution of the Charles river.

The city of Yonkers, N. Y., plans to rebuild the two small filters in its system, making them the same size as the large beds. They will also be covered.

Superintendent Lewis M. Bancroft of the Reading, Mass., water department recommended in his annual report, recently submitted to the board of water commissioners, that repairs be effected in the filter plant, pointing out that the strainer pipes need cleaning and repairing and the rate controllers should be cleaned and adjusted.

The state department of health has urged the Massachusetts legislature to enact drastic laws for the regulation of disposal of manufacturing wastes and sewage from industries located on the Taunton river in order to end the serious pollution of the river. The proposed legislation is meeting with vigorous opposition from many of the manufacturing interests that would be affected.

The water of Lake Michigan is said to be very much polluted and health authorities in Muskegon, Mich., recently warned consumers to boil all drinking water. Ihe water department heads state that the water must be boiled until the chlorinating system is installed at the pumping station. The state health department issued orders to the water company in Adrian, Mich., to triple the quantity of chlorine being used to purify the unfiltered water that it was necessary not long ago to pump into the mains.