Fine Waterworks Supply of Olympia.

Fine Waterworks Supply of Olympia.

Olympia, Wash., is to be congratulated on its fine supply of pure mountain spring water, its waterworks system and its administration. The system has been greatly extended during the past year and first-class pumping machinery added. All the laterals and mains, new and old, are of machine-banded wood, which has proved so satisfactory that its use will be continued for the future. Nine thousand one hundred and forty-two feet of wood pipe has already been supplied by the National Wood Pipe compai y. Of this, 8,702 ft. were machine-banded; the rest was bored. The banded pipe ranges in diameters from 4-in. to 12in., most of it the latter, and was built for head-pressures of from too to 350 ft. The 12in. pipe, built for a 350-ft. head, is banded with No. o standard-gauge wire, and has a shell iffj-in. thick. The remainder of the 12-in. pipe is banded with No. 2 wire and has a shell 1 1/4-in. thick. The bored pipe is of 2-in. diameter and is banded with 18-gauge steel. This pipe is for a head-pressure of 150 ft. Several wooden tanks, especially two large patent oilstorage ones, have been built. One of these has not leaked a drop during the three years that it has been in service. The Heisler flywheel pumping engines are also noticeable as the first that have been installed on the Pacific coast. This pumping engine is of the horizontal, cross-compound, flywheel, highduty type, and is provided with a double-acting, duplex water-end fitted with Heisler’s improved outside-packed plungers. The water is conveyed from springs at the head of Moxlie creek to the pumping station through an underground 14-in. wood pipe. The pressure in the business district of the city is maintained at 95 lb., affording excellent fire-protection. The reservoir is located at an elevation of 240 ft. above tide-water, and is built of concrete lined with cement, with a capacity of 2,500.000 gal. The company is now laying 12-in. pipe direct from the pumping station to the reservoir, the present system being to supply the city with water and the surplus going to the reservoir for storage. The pumping station is a model of neatness and efficiency, and the plant installed there is one of the best to be found anywhere. The business end of the waterworks is excellently represented by Harry C. Ilerrmans, president, and Charles M. Bolton, secretary and treasurer.

No posts to display