Fire at Washington.

Fire at Washington.

Chief F. J. Wagner and a large contingent of the fire equipment of Washington, D. C., including 12 engines—a rotary (Silsby), 6 Metropolitan, 1 American-La France, 3 Clapp & Jones, 1 La France and 1 Amoskeag—and 5. trucks—were called to a fire in the Martin Wiegand lumber mill and yard at 451-65 Maryland avenue S. W. The actual building had brick walls, with a wooden interior. It was 3-story, it occupied a space of about 75×135 ft., and had been erected at intervals between 10, 6, 5 and 2 years. The fire broke out in the afternoon in the second floor mouldingroom, and was caused by a spark from grit forming in a .sandpaper machine. When the department arrived, the flames were spreading rapidly through the plant. Connection was made with twenty double 6-in. hydrants separated from each other by a distance of 200 ft. „A 11 the streams, sixteen at one time, were thrown by the engines, which were well supplied ¾ .h water from the 10-in. main laid on the 80-ft.-wide street in front of the damaged building. Ten thousand feet of cotton, rubber-lined and rubber hose were laid, not one length of which burst—and only ordinary 1 }⅜-⅛. and 1 ½-in. nozzles were used. Eleven other buildings were slightly damaged by the flames to the extent of $360, fully insured. The’ spread of the flames was so rapid that there was not sufficient time for the employes to use the standpipe and hose. They were forced to run for their lives. The contents— machinery, tools, mill-work of all kinds, moulding, doors, blinds and dressed lumber were totally destroyed. Captain Hollohau, of the Fourteenth company, was slightly injured by a falling sill, but would not leave for the hospital until the fire was well under control. Working when the main wall fell, Captain Hollohan was struck. The heavy sill felled him, and for a few moments it appeared as though he were fatally injured. He struggled to his feet and insisted on going on with his company.

CHIEF F. J. WAGNER, WASHINGTON, D. C.

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