Fire Boat Nozzle.

Fire Boat Nozzle.

The illustration above is that of a new nozzle designed by D. A. Woodhouse, 12 Barclay street, New York, for fire boat service. The photograph from which the cut was produced is the nozzle in position on the Cataract, the new fire boat of the fire department, Baltimore, Md. The nozzle consists of a vertical brass pipe revolving inside of the iron base attached at its lower end to the pipe, direct from the pumps of the fire boat. This pipe sits forward rear and aft of the bitts, and it stands about five and one-half feet from the deck. To this pipe is attached an elbow curved to an angle of forty-five degrees, which is htted to the stand-pipe with a swivel joint. To this elbow is joined, by a swivel joint, another elbow, which curves to an angle of forty-five degrees, and to this latter elbow is attached a play pipe or nozzle. The size of the water way through, from deck to first elbow, is six inches. The water way tapers gradually through the two swiveling elbow connections to a four and one-half inch outlet, to which nozzles are attached, having four inch, three and one-half-inch and three-inch discharges. Ali the swiveling joints turn inside of separate bearings, which give great stability and ease in placing the stream in any position desired. The two swivelled joints combined make in effect a universal joint. They are each operated and controlled by worm gearings, by which the stream of water from the pump through this apparatus can be easily and quickly directed to any point, vertical or horizontal. A stream can be deflected in any direction and turned in an instant by the hands of one man. When the nozzle is place 1 in position for service, it can be left in that position. No strain or trouble will be found in holding, as all the resistance comes on the inside bearings and gearings, consequently there is no effort required by the man operating the pipe. This style of fire boat nozzle has been in service on the fire boats of the cities of Brooklyn and Buffalo for the past six years, where it has demonstrated that it is not only a safeguard against loss of life or limb by bursting hose, but its reliability at all times. It is also economical, as it dispenses with the use of several lengths of hose required by other pattern nozzles to feed the Siamese. The report of the board of fire commissioners of Baltimore on the trial of the nozzle on the Cataract says :

” The Woodhouse double swivel stand-pipe nozzle which was placed on fire boat Cataract was thoroughly tested to its full meiits, efficiency and capacity. One pump was used on a three-inch nozzle and both pumps on three and, one-half and four-inch nozzles. Each stream was thrown a great distance. The working and handling of the stand-pip* nozzle was entirely satisfactory.” George J. Linsenmeyer, superintendent of machinery of fire department.

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