Fire Department of New Brunswick.

Fire Department of New Brunswick.

CHIEF JOHN PUERSCHNER, NEW BRUNSWICK, N.J.

New Brunswick, N. J., is a progressive city with a progressive fire department under the command, of Chief John V. Puerschner, whose aides are Harry J. Francis and Louis Sass, respectively first and second assistant chiefs. For the better protection of the city it has been divided into three districts—the factory district, to which four steamers attend on a first alarm, and two more on a second; the business district, to which three steamers attend on a first alarm, and two additional on a second; the school district, to which three steamers attend on the first call and two additional on a second. Alarms from six boxes for another district are responded to by two steamers on the first call and one additional steamer on the second call. The theatre box, which covers the theatre, has two additional steamers respond to the second call. The balance of the boxes cover the resident district, and are responded to by two steamers on the first call and one additional steamer on the second. Hook and ladder and Liberty hose companies respond to all alarms, and the general alarm, which can be sent in only by the chief or either of his assistants, takes out the whole department. In the city are set 280 hydrants, the pressure at which ranges from 21 to 54 11). The Gamewell fire-alarm telegraph is installed, with thirty-three boxes. During the year the department responded to ninety alarms, thirty-eight from street boxes; fifty, still; two, false. The amount of insurance carried on property damaged by fire during the yepr was $139,065.49; total loss by fire, $6,786.54; excess of insurance over loss, $132,278.95—total loss, $6,786.54; total amount of insurance paid during the year, $6,77154—excess of insurance paid (net loss) $15. The department comprises 493 officers and men, distributed among 6 engine, 2 hook and ladder and 7 hose companies. The equipment is as follows: Steamers, 6; hose carriages, 7; hook and ladder trucks, 2; supply wagon; 2-wheel jumper; hose, good, first quality, 2,000 ft.; medium, 2,000 ft.; poor, 1,500 ft.—total 5,500 ft. Callahan shutoff nozzles, 7; horses in service, 19. Chief Puerschner recommends the following: A horse and wagon for the chief; the installation of six additional fire-alarm boxes—five in every school—all very much on account of the rapid growth of the city; a central supply station, with one man in charge, in which additional hose may be stored.

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