FIRE DEPARTMENT OF NEW YORK.

FIRE DEPARTMENT OF NEW YORK.

The report of Fire Commissioner Francis J. Lantry, of the fire department of Greater New York, for the quarter ending September 30, 1906, shows that in the boroughs of Manhattan, The Bronx and Richmond (S. I.), the total number of alarms was 1,998, of which 1,739 were for actual fires. Of these 1,401 were confined to the point of starting: ninety to the building; twenty-six extended to other buildings; five were in vessels; and 217 in places other than buildings and vessels. There were 1,120 fires extinguished without engine stream; 473, with one engine stream; 118, with two or three engine streams; and twenty-eight, with mere than three engine streams. The extent of damage to buildings and vessels was as follows; Built mainly of brick, stone or iron—slight, 105; considerable, thirty; built mainly of wood—slight, thirty-five; consider able, fourteen; destroyed, eight. There were 655 tires in July; 474 in August; 610 in September. Between 6 a. in. and 6 p. m. there were 924 tires, of which 351 occurred in July; 256 in August; and 317 in September. Between 6 p. in. and 6 a. m. there were 815 fires, of which 304 occurred in July; 218 in August; and 293 in September. The water consumption was 8,153,250 gals., of which 3.386,110 were river water. The total loss on buildings and contents w;o $564.873; estimated uninsured loss by tire, $48,254; average loss per tire. $324.82. The estimated amount of insur ancc on buildings was $32,748,525; estimated amount of insurance on contents, $8,079,575 to tal, $40,828,100. In the botoughs of Brooklyn and Queens there were 916 alarms during the same three months, of which 836 were actual tires. Of these 634 were confined to the point of starting; thirty-seven were confined to the building: thirty-one extended to other buildings; eleven were in vessels; and 123 in places other than buildings and vessels. There were 587 tires ex tinguished without an engine -tream; 159. with one engine stream; sixty-nine, with two or three engine streams, and twenty-one, with more than three engine streams. The extent of damage to buildings and vessels was as follows: Built mainly of brick, stone and iron slight, 204; considerable, twelve; destroyed, three; built mainly of woodslight. 299: considerable, tbirtv-two: destroyed, eighteen. In vessels and places other than build iugs and vessels, 134 total, 702. There wer 302 fires in July: 252 in August; and 282 in September. Between 6 a. m. and 6 p. m. there were 460 fires, of which 165 occurred in July; 136 in August: and 159 in September. Between 6 p in. and 6 a. m. there were 376 fires, of which 137 occurred in July; 11O in August; and 123 in September. The water consumption was 5,095, 102 gals., of which 417.285 were river water. The estimated loss, insured and uninsured was as fid low;*: On buildings and vessels. $209.965; on contents, $243.985-total. $453,950. Estimated in su ranee-On buildings and vessels. $5,867,500; on contents, $2,996,150—total, $8.8(13,650. Estimated uninsured loss—On buildingand vessels, $20,900; on contents, $31.650—total, $52,550. On January 1. 1906. the uniformed force of officers and members numbered 3.564—in the Manhattan, The Bronx and Richmond, 7,750 The total estimated loss amounted to $5,271,955. Of that number forty-three per cent, was for losses less than $10. Fifty-seven arrests were made for arson, of which fourteen convictions were secured and the prisoners sentenced. Of engine companies including the five firefioats. there were 168; of hookami ladder companies, seventy-one. besides chemical engines, water towers and reserve apparatus. It is intended to build a firemen’s college, somewhere in The Bronx, and new firehouses are being erected in the greater city to keep up with its growth. The fire-alarm telegraph apparatus is also to be remodeled, if a new one is not to be installed—some time.

FIRE DEPARTMENT OF NEW YORK

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FIRE DEPARTMENT OF NEW YORK

Fire Commissioner John H. O’Brien reports that during 1905 the policy of developing and extending the department and strengthening the various branches has been continued. The paid establishment has been extended to the borough of Richmond and the more thickly populated sections of Queens where not already covered by it. In Richmond fourteen companies in the paid service were put into commission. In Queens six companies were established. There are still extensions to be made in both boroughs.I he companies were located on the lines of the largest populations in localities. The fire department ot the city made greater strides last year than ever in its history. In Richmond fourteen companies were organised, and in Queens, six. In Manhattan and The Bronx four new companies were formed. There are now in Manhattan and ‘1 he Bronx eighty-three engines and twenty-nine trucks; in Brooklyn and Queens, sixty-eight engines and twenty-one trucks; in Richmond eight engines, a hose company and five trucks. The city lias seven fireboats, and three more are being built. He also makes public a letter which he sent to the mayor, recommending an issue of more than $6,000,000 in bonds for the betterment of the service during the next four years. He says the growth of the city has far outstripped the firefighting facilities. The commissioner says the department has outgrown the school for firemen, and ought to have in its place a firemen’s college, to cost $250,000. During 1905. 8,729 alarms were sounded. There were 201 more fires than in 1904. The loss was $5,271,955, or nearly $750,000 more than the year before. More explicit details are given farther on in this article. An entirely new fire alarm system is needed for Manhattan and The Bronx, and till that is installed, as a temporary reinforcement, the telephone service has been so satisfactorily arranged that every apparatus house can be reached from any part of the city, and each apparatus house can communicate with the others. The work of the bureau of violations and auxiliary fire appliances is now, after two years, producing results which demonstrate the value of a proper supervision over auxiliary fire appliances. Auxiliary fire protection, such as standpipes (fire lines) for buildings of unusual height, or area, and perforated pipes or automatic sprinklers for underground premises pesent problems new and varied, which are being handled with satisfactory results, not only to the men of the department, who operate the appliances at fires, but also, to the property owner who pays for the installation. The facilities for reaching fires more rapidly have been provided for by the gradual introduction of automobiles for the department, for the use of the chief officers, and these machines have proved a valuable adjunct to the fire department apparatus. The duties imposed upon the bureau of combustibles have been vastly increased by the enormous building operations which have been going on throughtout Greater New York for the last few years. A number of firemen, under the command of a captain of the department, have therefore, been detailed to the inspector of combustibles to aid in the inspection of the use of explosives at the points where the various construction operations are in progress. This plan has helped materially in safeguarding the lives and property of citizens. The report suggests the issue of bonds distributed over four years to meet the extra expense for rendering the fire protection of the city thoroughly efficient. It is estimated that for the installation of an entirely new and modern fire alarm system $2,000,000 can be profitably spent during the next four years. It is also necessary that the work of the school of instruction for firemen should be done on a much larger scale than at present. Greater room must be provided for the engineers who operate the engines. During 1882-83—the first year of the existing school of instruction on the fifth floor of headquarters’ building and the yard (for drilling)—in the yard—the average attendance was for many years continued to be about 100. On consolidation, however, Greater New York increased this number to 600–more in some years—too great a number for the school to handle properly and with justice to the men. The present premises and yard are now entirely inadequate. The fire commissioner, therefore, recommends building a college at a cost of $250,000 somewhere in The Bronx or in Richmond. An estimate is submitted of the expenses of the department for the four years of the present administration, and the total amount requested ns the appropriation is $9,262,loo. This includes additions to the uniformed force at a cost of $600,0001, and new apparatus and hose, $600,000. For Brooklyn and Queens is asked $1 .£43.000, of which $1,000,000 is for sites and buildings for new companies, and $200,000 for the equipment of new companies, while for Manhattan, The Bronx and Richmond is asked $6,120,400. The total fire loss, insured and uninsured, in Manhattan, The Bronx and Richmond, amounted to $5,271,955, of which $327.«xxi was on buildings and vessels; the estimated insurance amounted to $133,822, 119 on buildings and vessels; and on contents $28,519,182total. $162,341,305, total estimated insured loss, $416,815 ; average loss per fire, $680.25; number of fires. 7.750. In Brooklyn and Queens the total fire loss, insured and uninsured, for 3,774 alarms to actual fires was $2,117,559, of which $320,130 was on uninsured property; on insured buildings and vessels the loss was $1,825,659; on contents. $1,0814)03; on uninsured buildings and vessels. $118,1)65; on contents, $201,165; estimated insurance on buildings and vessels. $21,697,010; on contents, $10.286,68a -total. $31,983,690. In the fire department the superior officers of the uniformed force are as under: Chief; deputy chiefs, five; battalion chiefs, tw-entv-seven. Of foremen there are 112; assistant foremen. 169: engineers, 203; firemen, first grade, 811 ; second grade, 239; third grade, 266; fourth grade. 290; probationary, seven. There are four chaplains and six medical officers. There are also a chief constructor, and a chief of instruction, besides the attaches of the fire marshal’s office and those of the bureau of combustibles and the fire alarm telegraph. The water consumption at fires in Manbatatan and the Bronx was 103.984.484/) gals., of which 40,504,417 gals, were river water. In Brooklyn and Queens it was 27.349.328 gals., of which 8,427,723 gals, w’ere river water.