FIRE-FIGHTING AT FORT WORTH.

FIRE-FIGHTING AT FORT WORTH.

Chief Celia, who was recently somewhat severely injured while on duty at a fire in Fort Worth, Tex., reports that his department of forty-two men (of whom three are substitutes), divided into six companies, answered 161 alarms; traveled 120 miles; raised 2,560 feet of ladders; used 2,460 gallons of chemical fluid; laid 45,950 feet of hose at fires; and served in actual fire fighting 128 hours and fifty-five minutes. The value of property at risk was $764,190; amount of insurance at risk, $445,868.33; total amount of loss, $45,255.10; insurance paid, $41,871.45; actual loss, $3,283.65; number of fires in wooden buildings, 102; in brick, stone,and iron buildings, thirty-three; other than building fires, twentysix; number of fires at which the loss was “nominal” or less than $100, 118; loss from $100 to $500, fourteen; from $500 to $1,000, fourteen; from $1,000 to $2,000. ten; from $2,000 to $3,000, three; from $3,000 to $4,000, one; over $,000, one. The total expenses for running the department for the year amounted to $28,000, of which $24,540 was paid out in salaries alone. The valuation placed upon the buildings (five in all), is $47,750; on the apparatus, $46,797.45; on the Gamewell fire alarm system, $12,495.95. The one one aim and motto of the Fort Worth fire department is, “Efficient fire service.” The good work done by Chief Celia and his men shows they have reached that goal.

At Fort Duchesne, Price, Utah, the quartermasters’ stables were burned, and nineteen mules perished. This is the second fire within a week. It is suspected that the Ute Indians, who are preparing to escape back to Colorado, were the incendiaries, and hoped thereby to destroy the cavalry equipments so as to prevent pursuit.

No posts to display