Fire Gains Headway on Account of Sleeping Watchman

Fire Gains Headway on Account of Sleeping Watchman

The cause of the loss in a recent fire in Arlington, Cal., of a large quantity of fruit for canning, was the sleeping at his post of the watchman. The light from the burning cannery awoke a man in a house near by, who attempted to put it out with garden hose. This was about 3:30 a. m., and it was not until 4:30 o’clock that the fire department was called by telephone, which, of course, had given the fire a great start. The Arlington men called on the Riverside department—eight miles distant—for aid, and they responded, under command of Chief Joseph Schneider, with fifteen men and a Seagrave combination, carrying 1,200 feet of 2-inch hose and a 750-gallon American-LaFrance pumper with 1,000 feet of 2½-inch hose, all cotton rubber-lined. When the Riverside men arrived, after the eight-mile run, the fire, according to Chief Schneider’s report, “had done its work, and there was nothing to d.o but kill it off.” The fire was stopped just as the storehouse for the fruit already canned was becoming involved, and the damage to the contents, which were worth $50,000. was limited to $24,000. The building was of brick and wood construction, 60 x 120 feet in size, and had as fire protection two 11/2-inch standpipes, with 50 feet of hose to each. It was valued at $69,000, and was damaged to the extent of $10,000. Three 6-inch hydrants, 6-inch double, were available, and had a water pressure from a gravity system of 70 pounds. Two engine and two hydrant streams were thrown at one time from 11/8-inch nozzles. The “all out” signal was given in four hours.

The Dense Smoke that Handicapped the DepartmentNight View of the Fire at Its Height, Showing Its Great Extent

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