Fire in Business Section of Rome

Fire in Business Section of Rome

Rome, N.Y., had on February 8 its most serious fire s ince 1908, when three business blocks were wiped out. The Corcoran and Purdy blocks were practically destroyed and other building ;s nearby suffered damage. The Corcoran block, a three-story brick structure, 70 by 100 foe t, stands within half a square of the scene of the 1908 fire. Mayor Midlam sent a call to Utica and Oneida for help but it was found the Rome department, under Chief Engineer George M. Bower, was able to cope with the situation and the call to Oneida was countermanded. The fire started shortly before 1 A. M. and was discovered by a police officer who sent in the alarm. The fire originated in the basement of the Corcoran block and spread so rapidly that when the department arrived the building was a mass of flames. Chief Bower and No. 1 company were the first to arrive. The flames were then shooting across the street and awnings were burning and windows breaking in the stores opposite. The heat was so intense that the firemen received burns about their hands and faces in getting the first streams on the fire. At 1.40 o’clock the front wall of the Corcoran building fell in. From this block the fire spread to the Purdy block on the east side. After the Purdy block was afire the efforts of the firemen were directed to keeping the fire from extending to other structures and in this they were successful, after a hard fight, in which the efficiency of the department and the ample water supply told. The Glesman-Hower block, to the cast, caught fire under the cornice and for a time it was feared that this four-story building would fall victim, but the flames were extinguished. The department had in service one second size Metropolitan engine, one fourth size Clapp & Jones engine, one combination wagon, two hose sleighs, one sleigh truck, one aerial truck and two supply sleighs. There were seven engine streams and six hydrant streams on the fire, two of them being thrown by the engine from Utica. Eleven 6-inch double hydrants 100 to 300 feet apart supplied by a 10-inch main furnished an abundant water supply. The pressure at the hydrants was 75 pounds; 6,300 feet of hose were used.

CHIEF ENGINEER GEORGE M. BOWER, ROME, N. Y.HEAVY STREAMS BEING USED TO WET DOWN THE RUIN’S OF FIRE AT ROME, N. Y.

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