Fire-Loss at Amsterdam.

Fire-Loss at Amsterdam.

The fire-loss at Amsterdam, N. Y., during 1907 was about the average of that in past years. It exceeded that of 1906 by $6,235.90; but was less than that of 1905. The department under the command of Chief William Stichel answered eighty-three alarms, of which seven were false. There were also ten other alarms for which no alarm was turned in. Of the fires that occurred during the year forty’ were confined to frame buildings; twenty-seven, to brick buildings; one, to stone. In the other instances, where the department was called out, fence, grass and rubbish fires were extinguished. In a total of sixtv-seven occasions in. responding to fires the department used water thirty-five times and chemicals thirty-two times. The aggregate loss on the buildings during the year was $16,419.91 and the loss on contents $22.722.56–making a total insurance loss of $39,142.47. The Amsterdam fire department consists of one chief, one assistant chief, one superintendent of the firealarm telegraph system, five drivers, five pipemen, four laddermen, five hosemen—making a total of twenty-two firemen. The apparatus consists of four combination chemical and hose wagons, one hook and ladder truck, one steamer, four two-wheel hose carts, five sets of sleighs, two exercise wagons—all in excellent condition. More hose is needed—at least 1,000 ft. The present supply consists of 6,600 ft., and of this there are 5,300 ft. of first-class hose and 1,300 ft. of second-class. This supply is not sufficient, for of the 6,600 feet there are 4,400 ft. in continual service. This leaves only 2,200 ft. in reserve, when there should be at least as much at command as there is in use on the wagons. Action should also be taken to equip more of the apparatus with rubber tires, as those already fitted to certain pieces have been productive of most excellent results. As the western end of the city is thickly populated and full of buildings, many of them of wood, a fire breaking out there might prove very disastrous in every way. Chief Stichel, therefore, begs that a firehouse may be built and equiped for the protection of that territory, to reach which the department has now to make a very long run. During the past year there were added to the department and have aided materially in strengthening it, a new enginehouse,two new hose wagons, one pair of sleighs, 1,000 ft. of hose, three new firealarm boxes and seven additional men.

Chief William Stichel. Amsterdam, N. Y.

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