FIRE-LOSS IN FEBRUARY.

FIRE-LOSS IN FEBRUARY.

Except for the abnormal loss in February, 1904, caused by the Baltimore fire, the fire-loss in the preceding month would have exceeded that of the corresponding period in 1905 and 1906, as will be seen from the accompanying table:

For the first two months of the year, therefore, the average fire-loss per month has been $21,970,750—an average which, it continued during the year, will make this another unprofitable year for the insurance companies. The most destructive fires in February were as under: Chelton Hills (Wanamaker residence). $850,000; Alpena, Mich., cement works; Astoria, Queens borough, New York, automobile factory, $350.000; Niagara Falls, N. Y., bleaching powder factory, $340,011; Troy, N. Y., waste factory, $300,000; Harrisburg, Fa., eight business buildings, $250,01×1; Brooklyn, New York, macaroni factory and other, $250,01×1; Syracuse, N. Y., hotel and business block, $238,000; Pittsburg. Pa , office furniture factories, $210,000. During February there were 370 fires in which the loss was from $10,000, upwards. They are classified as follows: $10,000 to $20,000. 147: $20,000 to $30,000, seventy-one; $30,000 to $50,000, forty-five; $50,000 to $75,000. forty-eight ; $75,000 to $100,000, twenty-seven; $ioo,oco to $200,000, twenty-nine; $200,000 and over, twelve.

FIRE-LOSS IN FEBRUARY.

FIRE-LOSS IN FEBRUARY.

THERE were some fairly destructive fires in February and a very large proportion of small fires whose aggregate of loss reached a largo figure. Still, the total loss has been considerably less than in the corresponding month of 1899 aud 1000, as will be seen from the following table:

From the above table we learn that tho average loss in each of the first two months of this year was $15,283,475, which, if maintained during the whole of the year, would mean a total loss for 1901 of $183,401,700, nearly $20,000,000 above last year’s total—a prospect not fraught with encouragement to the underwriters. The number of fires during February whose destructiveness was from $10,000 upwards was 221, classified as follows: Ten thousand dollars to $20,000, eightyslx; $20,000 to $30,000, thirty-three; $30,000 to $50,000, twenty-eight; $50,000 to $75,000, twenty-eight; $75,000 to $100,000, thirteen ; $100,000 to $200,000, twenty-five; $200,000 to $750,000. eight. The fires of the greatest destructiveness during the mouth were as follows; Pittsburgh, Pa., cork works, $750,000; Atlanta, Ga., several wholesale stores, $668,000: Appleton, Wis., paper mills, and New Haven, Conn., wire works, $425,000 each; Rochester, Pa., glass tumbler works, and Scranton, Pa., business block, $400,000 each; Cleveland, Ohio, wholesale millinery store, $393,000; Brooklyn borough, New York, street car barn, $300,000. It appears that the fires during the last month destroyed a greater proportion of insured property than during the same month in 1899 and 1900—so many of the buildings destroyed, with their contents, being big mercantile houses or manufactories insured for their full value, making it a very costly mouth to the Insurance offices.